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Secret Service Director Julia Pierson abruptly resigned Wednesday in the face of multiple revelations of security breaches, bumbling in her agency and rapidly eroding confidence that the president and his family were being kept safe.

Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell is criticizing his Democratic opponent for drawing her state paycheck while away from work to campaign. Left unsaid in the new TV ad is that McConnell appears to be taking his government salary while campaigning, too.

In a striking public rebuke, the Obama administration warned Israel on Wednesday that plans for a controversial new housing project in east Jerusalem would distance Israel from "even its closest allies" and raise questions about its commitment to seeking peace with Palestinians.

It's not Obamacare or climate change. It's not yet terrorism or fear of the Islamic State group. Those issues are on the minds of voters as they begin casting ballots in this year's midterm elections, but nothing matters to American voters as much the economy.

A mining project under regulatory review has fueled a sharp exchange among Minnesota's candidates for governor.

The strength of Minnesota's economy put Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton and Republican nominee Jeff Johnson at odds Wednesday night in an opening debate that also saw skirmishes over health care and transportation.

The decision by Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes to defend the state's polygamy and gay marriage bans is a waste of money, according to Democrat Charles Stormont.

President Barack Obama announced in May 2013 that no lethal strike against a terrorist would be authorized without "near-certainty that no civilians will be killed or injured."

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel on Wednesday directed military medical officials to show within 45 days how they will improve care, patient safety and access to treatment at underachieving military health care facilities.

It's October and in some places, voters are already voting. The latest Associated Press-GfK poll finds those likely to cast a ballot are focused more on the economy than other issues. But that hasn't stopped campaigns from trying to appeal on other topics as well. Here's a look at what voters think on the top issues of the election cycle.

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