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Eating For Health

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Grilled trout cuts down on saturated fat

Jill Wendholt Silva

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  • Fish

    Developed by home economists Kathryn Moore and Roxanne Wyss.

    1/4 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves

    4 cloves garlic, divided

    Grated zest of 1 lemon

    1 1/8 teaspoons pepper, divided

    1/4 teaspoon salt, divided

    2 dressed trout, about 10 to 12 ounces each

    2 tablespoons olive oil, divided

    3 tablespoons fresh-squeezed lemon juice

    2 small zucchini or yellow squash, cut lengthwise into 1/4-inch slices

    1 tablespoon minced flat-leaf parsley

    Lemon wedges (optional; garnish)

    COMBINE parsley, 3 cloves garlic, lemon zest, 1 teaspoon pepper and 1/8 teaspoon salt in a food processor. Pulse to chop evenly. Spoon half of parsley mixture into the cavity of each fish, spreading to coat evenly.

    PREHEAT grill to medium-high or allow coals to burn down to white ash. Spray grill grate with nonstick spray. Evenly coat fish with 1 tablespoon olive oil. Place oiled fish on hot grill. Grill over direct heat in uncovered grill, 6 minutes. With a wide, metal spatula, gently turn fish. Grill 6 minutes or until fish is just opaque. (Do not overcook.)

    MINCE remaining clove garlic and combine with remaining 1 tablespoon oil, lemon juice, and remaining salt and pepper. Brush zucchini slices generously with lemon juice mixture. Grill zucchini 10 to 12 minutes or until crisp-tender, turning to cook evenly and brushing frequently with lemon juice mixture.

    ARRANGE zucchini on serving plate. Gently open fish and cut in half along backbone to make two fillets. Arrange fish over zucchini. Garnish with minced parsley and lemon wedges.

    Yield:

    4 servings.

    PER SERVING: 171 calories; 2g carbohydrate; 25g protein; 7g fat (35% calories from fat, 1g saturated fat); 65mg cholesterol; 260mg sodium; 2g dietary fiber.



By now you've probably heard how super salmon is for you, but it turns out that trout is in the same family and also contains plenty of omega-3, a fatty acid that is good for heart health. The American Heart Association recommends that we eat at least two fish meals per week.

Trout also is a lean protein source that is low in sodium, a good source of vitamins and high in niacin, a B vitamin that helps the body use carbohydrates efficiently.

Grilled Trout and Vegetables With Gremolata adds a parsley, lemon and garlic-based garnish for a flavor boost. Skip the coleslaw that's so traditional with fish dinners and serve the whole fish over grilled zucchini.

Jill Wendholt Silva is the food editor of the Kansas City Star; jsilva@kcstar.com.

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