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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

In response to “Business owner warns workers Obama win might mean layoffs” (Oct. 10):

Romney should disavow Florida employer who threatens layoffs

Florida time-share mogul David Siegel warns his workers that if they don’t vote for Mitt Romney he might have to close his business and might even retire to the Caribbean, taking away their jobs. But he says he’s not telling them how to vote.

Hogwash.

Mr. Siegel obviously thinks he is living in a banana republic where he can bully his workers into doing his bidding. I’m waiting for the disavowal from the Romney campaign. And bon voyage, Mr. Siegel.

Alan Singerman

Mooresville


In response to “Poof! Romney washes away issues stands” and “Obama’s worldview evolved” (Oct. 10 Viewpoint):

I see bias when pundits say Obama evolves, Mitt flip-flops

Thanks to the left-leaning gurus in the Observer’s Editorial Department, we’ve now been handed another shrouded explanation – as was obvious on Wednesday’s Viewpoint page – on a presidential candidate’s mutating viewpoints.

When Mitt Romney modifies his standpoint on an issue, it’s called “flip-flopping.” When Barack Obama does the same, it’s called “evolution” of ideas. Go figure.

Can’t wait for the day after the election, when objectivity in political journalism returns! (Note to self: No it won’t.)

Ernest Wiatrek

Albemarle


Lowering taxes for rich would be ‘insanity’; failed us last time

Einstein observed that insanity is repeating behavior expecting different results.

Lower taxes for the rich and deregulation brought the near collapse of the U.S. economy in fall 2008. The average American lost 40 percent of his/her net worth, and 8 million jobs were lost.

The Republican plan for the economy is more tax cuts for the rich and more deregulation, especially for Wall Street. So it comes down to voting for the insane policies of Mitt Romney and the Republicans or the sane policies of the president.

You pick.

Bob Harrison

Wingate


In response to Paul Krugman “Economy is on the mend as some root for U.S. failure,” (Oct. 9 Viewpoint):

Krugman’s failed ideology doesn’t stand up to test of time

Paul Krugman has been trying all his life to sell “the blessings of socialism,” which are nothing more than empty promises that perpetuate the biggest economic myth going today – being able to get something for nothing.

History is very clear on this. Societies that have tried the big government, central planning route have all ended up worse off, many landing on the “ash heap of history.” Societies that have put liberty above all else have prospered.

The choice is clear, more liberty and less government.

Ben Fletcher

Charlotte


In response to Beauford Burton’s “Romney’s wealth makes him more attractive” (Oct. 7 For the Record):

Romney’s wealth doesn’t worry me, but list of other issues does

Mr. Burton,

It is not Mitt Romney’s money or success that disturbs me. I am concerned:

• that he will get us into another war in the Middle East.

• that in the last 30 years the wealth of the bottom 99 percent increased by less than 15 percent, while that of the top 1 percent increased by 258 percent thanks to legislation favoring the very wealthy.

• that he will allow the Koch Brothers to contaminate the underground aquifers and soil in the grain belt.

• that his Supreme Court appointees will set women back 50 years.

• that he repeatedly flip-flops on issues.

Marilyn Cirulis

Charlotte


Passing students who fail does more harm than good in N.C.

As an instructor at an N.C. community college I see masses of high school graduates who must go through remediation to begin their “higher level” of education.

This means job security for me, but what does it say about our success in raising the graduation rate?

Let N.C. teachers and principals do their job. If a student does not pass a class, let the teachers and schools fail them.

We should raise, not inflate, the graduation rate.

I’ve learned much in my life due to failure. Give N.C. children the opportunity to learn, grow, and when necessary, fail.

Michael Boone

Hickory


Pink is great, but prostate cancer deserves more attention

I totally support the “pink” movement regarding breast cancer awareness.

But as a 65-year-old man with stage 4 prostate cancer I’m disturbed by the focus on the No. 1 cancer affecting women while the No. 1 non-skin cancer among men seems to be ignored.

In NASCAR we see pink race cars. In the NFL we see pink shoes. It’s obvious October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Does anyone know that September was Prostate Cancer Awareness Month?

C’mon man!

Dennis Smith

Mooresville

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

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