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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

In response to “GOP talk of embassy security ignores impact of budget cuts” (Oct. 26 Forum):

Lack of security in Benghazi wasn’t a product of budget

Forum writer Chuck Gardner, in his letter blaming lack of embassy security in Benghazi on budget cuts by the GOP, is misinformed.

Charlene Lamb, the official in charge of embassy security at the State Department, testified at the Congressional hearings several weeks ago that budget cuts had nothing to do with the lack of adequate security in Benghazi.

Philip Howerton Jr.

Charlotte


Romney’s debate positions didn’t seem very original

In college, I typed term papers with carbon copies (pre-computers). The first carbon copy was often okay but never quite as good as the original.

Mitt Romney’s remarkable agreements with many of President Obama’s key positions at the last debate reminded me of those carbon copies.

Jack Shimell

Charlotte


To the campaign sign thief: Don’t you value free speech?

Whoever stole our Obama yard sign is an un-American thief. The fact that he/she left the two small American flags that were on the sign in our mailbox does not change the fact that you are a thief.

By the way, does the right to free speech apply only to you?

Ed McGuire

Waxhaw


Re-electing Obama would

be bad for business, jobs

After 40 years of owning several businesses and hiring people, I can assure you that most businesses fear and don’t trust President Obama. Therefore, they will not offer any jobs until Obama is gone.

This affects not only you, but your family and friends. How hard is that for all voters to understand?

Max Carozza

Swansboro

Obama has been superb in filling judge vacancies

The writer is a professor of law at the University of Richmond.

“Uninspiring choices for president” (Oct. 21 Editorial) correctly describes the current dissatisfaction with both nominees but also offers numerous reasons to vote for the incumbent. Another is Obama’s cooperation with North Carolina’s senators in filling judicial openings.

Thanks to their cooperation a number of vacancies have been filled with superb judges, like Charlotte’s own Fourth Circuit Judge Albert Diaz. This development is good for the courts and the nation.

Carl Tobias

Richmond, Va.


Romney’s plan doesn’t add up; don’t buy the ‘snake oil’

In 2009, the latest year for which the IRS has published data, those with incomes over $250,000 reported total income of $1.649 trillion, taxable income of $1.383 trillion and total income tax of $396 billion, an effective rate of 28.6 percent.

Mitt Romney would reduce this rate to 22.9 percent. Eliminating all deductions would generate only $377 billion, leaving the wealthy another $19 billion and the federal budget another $19 billion in deficit.

To generate the same amount of tax revenue would require taxable income of $1.729 trillion, 5 percent more than the total income of this class of taxpayers.

As President Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and many economists have said, the math doesn’t work!

When are Americans going to stop buying this snake oil?

Thomas Strini

Mint Hill


In response to “A part-time life as hours shrink, shift” (Oct. 28):

All of us should object to corporations’ sinister policy

Thank you for publishing the article by the New York Times reporter Steven Greenhouse regarding the shift to a part-time workforce.

This trend has been in the making for years. This article highlights the common practice of large corporations offering jobs at low wages and then encouraging workers to make up the difference between part-time and full-time wages with food stamps and Medicaid which is clearly a tax-payer subsidy for big business.

I find it hard to abide a system that makes these kinds of corporations the largest beneficiaries of welfare while putting responsible business owners at a disadvantage and leaving hard-working Americans feeling trapped.

We need to hold these companies responsible for this sinister staffing policy.

Amber Johnson Logan

Charlotte


In response to “Growing CMPD camera network stirs concern” (Oct. 28):

Surveillance cameras in public areas don’t violate privacy

Opponents of surveillance cameras worry about invasion of privacy and racial profiling? If you are out in a public area is privacy really an issue? And profiling criminal activity is what the cameras are there for.

Let’s get more cameras out there.

John W. McAlister, Jr

Charlotte

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

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