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McCrory wins N.C. governor's race; pledges to 'bring this state together'

Former Charlotte Mayor Pat McCrory is headed to Raleigh as North Carolina’s governor, following his victory Tuesday over Walter Dalton.

Meanwhile, Republican Richard Hudson defeated incumbent Democrat Larry Kissell in the race for North Carolina’s 8th District congressional seat.

Other results:

Republican Mitt Romney has won South Carolina.

Democrat Mel Watt has won re-election in North Carolina’s 12th congressional district.

Republican Patrick McHenry has won re-election in North Carolina’s 10th congressional district.

Democrats are leading in the race for three at-large Mecklenburg County commissioners’ seats.

McCrory, who lost a narrow decision in 2008 to Democrat Bev Perdue, said he received a concession phone call Tuesday evening from Dalton, and he said he also got phone calls from Republican governors Chris Christie of New Jersey and Nikki Haley of South Carolina.

He said Perdue, who chose not to seek re-election, also called to offer her help in the transition.

“It can happen -- the curse is over,” McCrory said, referring to the Democrats’ two-decade-long control of the Governor’s Mansion.

President -- North Carolina: With 15 electoral votes at stake, a close election is expected. Both parties made numerous appearances in the Tar Heel State, and radio and television advertising spending was much higher than in 2008.

Barack Obama has a narrow lead over Mitt Romney. With 51.4 percent of the vote in, Obama has 50.6 percent of the votes, to 48.6 percent for Romney. Libertarian Gary Johnson has 0.8 percent.

President -- South Carolina: Romney had 52.9 percent of the vote, with 21.3 percent of the ballots counted. Obama had 45.8 percent. Romney gains nine electoral votes from this victory.

Governor -- North Carolina: With 48.3 percent of the vote in, Republican Pat McCrory, Charlotte’s former mayor, had 54.3 percent of the vote. Democrat Walter Dalton had 43.7 percent, and Libertarian Barbara Howe had 2 percent.

All of the major networks and the Associated Press declared McCrory the winner around 8:30 p.m.

In his victory speech, McCrory said his organization ran a positive campaign.

“Serving in government can be honorable,” he said. “You don’t have to tear down another person to make it happen.”

He said the positive campaign should help him accomplish one of his goals -- to build a consensus of Republicans, Democrats and independents.

Dalton gave a concession speech about 9:15 p.m.

Congress -- 9th District: With 34.2 percent of the votes counted, Republican Robert Pittenger had 51.4 percent of the votes, to 46.5 percent for Democrat Jennifer Roberts. Libertarian Curtis Campbell had 2.1 percent.

The winner will fill the seat being vacated by Republican Sue Myrick, who had served in Congress for 18 years but is retiring.

Roberts, 52, a Mecklenburg County commissioner for the past eight years, was vastly outspent during the campaign by Pittenger, 64, who served in the N.C. Senate for four years until 2008. According to reports, Pittenger spent more than $3 million in a bid for Congress -- six times the amount spent by Roberts.

Congress -- 8th District: In a race closely watched around the nation, Republican Richard Hudson had 57.7 percent of the votes, to 42.3 percent for incumbent Democrat Larry Kissell. That is with 26.3 percent of the votes counted.

District boundaries had been changed since 2010, when Kissell defeated incumbent Republican Robin Hayes. The new district makeup is majority Republican, and national GOP organizations pumped large amounts of money into this race.

Kissell issued a concession statement about 10 p.m., saying, “Things didn’t work out as we had hoped, but as I told Richard (Hudson) earlier on the phone, he’ll be representing some of the best people in the world. I have considered it an honor to represent the people of the 8th District, and I look forward to the remainder of my term.”

Congress -- other Carolinas races: In District 12, Democrat Mel Watt of Charlotte was the projected winner, with an edge of 82.1 percent to 17.9 percent for Republican Jack Brosch. That is with 29.1 percent of the votes counted.

In District 10, conservative Republican Patrick McHenry of Cherryville was projected as the winner, with 83.2 percent of the results in. He had 56.4 percent of the vote, to 43.6 percent for Democrat Patsy Keever of Asheville.

In South Carolina’s District 5, Republican Mick Mulvaney had 54.9 percent of the vote, to 45.1 percent for Democrat Joyce Knott.

Mecklenburg County commissioners: Seven of nine seats on the Mecklenburg County board of commissioners were at stake Tuesday, with voters selecting three at-large and four district members. Only two district members ran without opposition.

Democrats were leading, with returns from 133 of 195 precincts. The leaders were Democrats Pat Cotham (20.1 percent), Kim Michele Ratliff (19.9 percent) and Trevor Fuller (19.4 percent).

Trailing were Republicans Michael Hobbs (12.7 percent), James Peterson (12.6 percent) and Wayne Powers (12.5 percent), with Libertarian Jason Bateman (2.8 percent) trailing.

In District 1, Republican incumbent Karen Bentley had 52.3 percent, to 47.7 percent for Democratic challenger Keith Bradford. That is with returns from 10 of 21 precincts.

In District 2, With returns from 18 of 29 precincts, Democratic incumbent Vilma Leake piled up a big lead over Republican Kevin Spitzmiller, 82.2 percent to 17.8 percent.

In District 5, A new commissioner will be selected in this south Charlotte district, where the seat was held previously by Neil Cooksey, who died last month of cancer. With returns from 40 of 51 precincts, Republican Matthew Ridenhour had a 56.7-to-43.3 percent lead.

In District 6, With returns from 21 of 29 precincts, Republican incumbent Bill James led with 57 percent of the votes, to 43 percent for Democrat Connie Green-Johnson.

N.C. General Assembly: While many local state House candidates were unopposed Tuesday, there were races in a handful of districts.

In Senate District 37, Incumbent Daniel Clodfelter led Republican Michael Vadini, 69 percent to 31 percent. That is with returns from 33 of 48 precincts. This seat is in southwest Mecklenburg.

In Senate District 38, Two newcomers competed in this district, which covers west Mecklenburg. With returns from 22 of 34 precincts, Democrat Joel Ford had a big lead, with 80.8 percent to 19.2 percent for Republican Richard Rivette.

In Senate District 39, longtime Republican incumbent Robert Rucho had 61.4 percent of the vote, to 38.6 percent for Democrat Jack Flynn. That is with returns from 42 of 55 precincts in this southeast Mecklenburg district.

In Senate District 40 In this northeast Mecklenburg district, Democratic incumbent Malcolm Graham had 84.9 percent of the vote, to 15 percent for Republican Earl Lyndon Philip. That is with returns from 33 of 48 precincts.

Republican Jeff Tarte of Cornelius was unopposed in Senate District 41, which stretches from Davidson, Huntersville and Cornelius in north, down through Mint Hill and Matthews.

In House District 88, challenger Rob Bryan, a Republican, led over longtime incumbent Democrat Martha Alexander, 55.1 percent to 44.9 percent. That is with returns from 21 of 28 precincts.

Democrat Robin Bradford, a community activist, ran against Republican Charles Jeter in House District 92. With returns from 6 of 15 precincts, Jeter had 50.2 percent, to 49.8 percent for Bradford.

This district includes west Mecklenburg, from the Lake Wylie area up to Huntersville.

Unopposed: District 98 (Cornelius and Davidson): Republican Thom Tillis, the Speaker of the House; District 99 (northeast Charlotte): Democrat Rodney Moore; District 100 (southeast Charlotte): Democrat Tricia Cotham; District 101 (west Charlotte): Democrat Beverly Miller Earle; District 102 (southwest Charlotte): Democrat Becky Carney; District 103 (southeast Mecklenburg): Republican Bill Brawley; District 104 (south Mecklenburg): Republican Ruth Samuelson; District 105 (Ballantyne area): Republican Jacqueline Schaffer; District 106 (north Charlotte): Democrat Carla Cunningham; District 107 (northeast Mecklenburg): Democrat Kelly Alexander.

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