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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

In response to “GOP activists fill team for McCrory transition” (Nov. 9):

McCrory’s appointments scare me; too many polarizing figures

Governor-elect Pat McCrory, you were so right when you said: “There’s no place to hide. You’re always in front of the people.”

Even before you take office, you’ve given us an idea of how you’ll govern by selecting some very conservative, divisive people for your transition team. Art Pope is an extremely polarizing figure in North Carolina. Several others on the “team” have direct connections to him.

Many Democrats crossed over to vote for you because you were a good mayor and governed from the middle. Now we know.

Those of us who hoped you might govern from a more centrist position should be very afraid.

Judi Howe

Cornelius


Work on spending cuts first, then we’ll talk tax increases

If President Obama and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid are sincere about working with the other side, they should start by passing a budget.

The U.S. House has passed a budget and sent it to the Senate.

Sen. Reid should pass whatever budget he wants, then send it to the joint House/Senate committee to work out compromises.

After there is a budget that includes spending cuts – start by eliminating GSA offsite meetings and reducing travel by House/Senate members and the president – then there can be a discussion about tax increases.

Bruce Moline

Charlotte


Obama won, but reluctant businesses still won’t invest

The day after President Obama was re-elected the Dow Jones Average was down 313 points.

Is this the first sign of history beginning to repeat itself?

I think so, because money goes where it is treated best, and the Obama tax/spend/borrow economy does not treat it well.

It’s hard to believe so many voters are giving him a chance to do it all again.

There are trillions of dollars on the sidelines that would’ve been used for investment, expansion, research and jobs, that will now stay on the sidelines.

Jim Bennett

Tega Cay, S.C.


In response to “GOP reach out? No! Americans must come to their senses” (Nov. 9 Forum):

Don’t forget who’s behind economic plan GOP floated

So let me get this straight: The only sound economic plan for the United States is one crafted by old, white, men? We are doomed!

Tracey Rossman

Concord


Election results show GOP is dying; we need a third party

While both parties are beholden to fringe influences, America has lost trust in the Republican Party. Leaders like Mitch McConnell and John Boehner have shown they cannot govern effectively.

So, what now?

Yes, Republicans control the U.S. House, but without effective leaders to forge consensus and bring moderates together to do the work of the people, that small measure of check and balance equals dysfunction, logjam and misery for the American public.

It’s time for clear-minded reasonable Americans to abandon the two-party system and forge a third party that can unite the centrists among us and marginalize fringe elements that have co-opted the Democrat and Republican parties.

Anthony S. Bellino

Waxhaw

A bipartisan list of those who should resign from Congress

Sen. Mitch McConnell failed in his only stated objective for the past two years: To get rid of President Obama. McConnell should now resign and let a new leader take his place, someone who’ll work for the American people and resolve the problems this nation faces. Oh, and by the way, take John Boehner, Harry Reid and Nancy Pelosi with you.

Pat Padgett

Rockingham


Mitt’s loss lies not with GOP, but with state of society today

I’m tired of pundits asking “what did the Republicans do wrong?”

My answer: They had the audacity to run a candidate with dignity and values who believed in hard work and personal responsibility against a candidate and party who are morally bankrupt and believe the government is responsible for taking care of everyone, negating the need for independence and self-reliance.

Unfortunately, more Americans now favor the latter rather than the former.

Catherine Stout

Indian Trail


In response to Fannie Flono “Monied interests tilted election scales” (Nov. 9 Opinion):

Severely limit campaigns to eliminate influence of money

At last Fannie Flono and I have reached common ground per her opinion regarding election finances.

I favor limiting the presidential campaign to 90 days. The first 60 days would be devoted to the selection of candidates with a common primary date. Winners of the primary would have an additional 30 days to campaign before the general election.

Each primary winner would have a spending cap based on the funds generated via the presidential check-off on tax returns. This would eliminate the “monied interest” that corrupts the system.

Ed Carlson

Charlotte

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

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