Save Money in this Sunday's paper

comments

Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

In response to “Judge restricts license plates” (Dec. 11):

We’re taking this politically correct thing way too far

Does anyone see the insanity of all this? Why not a personalized license plate with profanity on it, or one that says “There is no God”?

It is better if we just do away with these plates and go back to standard plates for all.

Maybe we should not show numbers or the state’s name on plates in case anyone objects.

Kim Thomas Purcell

Mooresville


In response to “Foxx plan may cut streetcar” (Dec. 11):

Mayor Foxx’s No. 1 priority should be to rein in spending

In this current economic climate, with many unemployed and others continuing to lose their jobs, it is incredibly self-centered and disingenuous for our mayor to push a property tax increase and his beloved streetcar.

Our politicians call for shared sacrifice, but only propose actions that make the citizens sacrifice while they merrily spend our money. We are all facing increased taxes from the federal government because they can’t rein in their unrelenting appetite for the citizens’ money. Now we have a mayor doing the same thing.

When are we going to be allowed to keep our hard-earned wages, instead of having it stolen by our government?

Hank Federal

Charlotte

Kinsey has her eye on pretty streetlights, but not on budget

At Monday’s Charlotte City Council meeting, Patsy Kinsey once again proved how tone deaf she is to the needs of her constituents. In a discussion about decorative streetlights for the trolley line, she said that we should make them like the streetlights on Elizabeth Avenue. Then, she gushed about how pretty they were.

At a time when local government probably has a rating about as low as Congress, we need representatives who are more in touch with the economic hardships of citizens, rather than those who gush over pretty lights that many who must pay for them will never see.

Stan Patten

Charlotte


In response to “Overturn DOMA, rule for same-sex marriage” (Dec. 11 Editorial):

Same-sex marriage against my beliefs, but I won’t stand in way

I am a Republican, and although I do not believe in same-sex marriage, I do agree that everyone in a free-will society should be able to live and love as they please. Everyone deserves to live a happy life.

Irene Corey

Charlotte


In response to “Poll: Voters want budget solution, but endorse few ideas” (Dec. 11):

Enough with the polls; we need more articles with fiscal facts

How about polling on the truth behind these economic issues? The media seem more concerned with fanning the Republican vs. Democratic flames than seeking solutions.

Fact is, the electorate has no clue the depth and extent of our fiscal troubles. Those facts are never the subject of these articles or these “polls.”

How can the American public have a valid opinion on a topic when they know hardly anything about the subject?

Matthew Wall

Charlotte

In response to “Talks on ‘fiscal cliff’ seem at standstill” (Dec. 11) and related articles:

Threat of ‘fiscal cliff’ ripples out from my pocketbook to others

I had planned to buy a new car next year as the current one will be seven years old and have over 100,000 miles.

If we go off the fiscal cliff, I’ll have to postpone that purchase. The additional taxes I’ll pay equal my car payment.

I can live without a new car, but that purchase would help pay someone’s salary, be a small addition to GM’s bottom line, and help our economy.

Many of us in the “98 percent” are making similar decisions. Are you listening Congress? This is personal.

Sue Friday

Charlotte

GOP just now conceding the obvious; no applause from me

Imagine if people in Congress entered “cliff” negotiations unwilling even to consider spending cuts. Would they be considered credible participants?

Then imagine some of them acknowledging that some cuts might be necessary. Would that mean they should be lauded as pragmatic compromisers for conceding the obvious?

Funny how it worked that way for those opposed to any tax increases.

Bruce Nofsinger

Charlotte


In response to “N.C. may be first state to charge students with cyber crimes” (Dec. 1):

I support cyber-bullying law designed to protect teachers

The writer is a sixth grader at Randolph Middle School.

I believe teachers should be protected against acts of harassment online from students.

Freedom of speech should come with responsibility and respect in a civilized society. Children must learn responsibility when using technology.

Depending on the severity of each offense, criminal penalties may be necessary to hinder the prevalence of malicious activities towards teachers. There should be a campaign to educate students about proper online behaviors.

Emery Tran

Charlotte

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

  Read more



Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

  Read more


Quick Job Search
Salary Databases
Your 2 Cents
Share your opinion with our Partners
Learn More