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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

In response to “Should N.C. expand Medicaid?” (Feb. 3 Viewpoint):

Want to save money? Keep people out of emergency rooms

Sen. Tom Apodaca seems to think the only way to control Medicaid costs is to cut. But making health care accessible sooner will allow people to get care while it is easier and less expensive, rather than waiting until it is critical and they show up at an emergency room. A healthy population will also be good for the economy as people who are healthy can show up and be productive at their jobs.

Harry Sparks

Matthews

Not only the poor delay health care for financial reasons

I agree with Dr. Jessica Saxe: We can save lives by expanding coverage of Medicaid. But choosing to hold off on a medical procedure because of the cost is not just a low-income problem. Health insurance costs have skyrocketed and the amount of coverage has decreased to the point where many middle class families, covered by insurance plans, postpone needed care because they can’t afford it. If we could fix the underlying causes of rapidly increasing health care costs, we could save more lives and wouldn’t be having the debate over expanding Medicaid.

Kevin Vance

Matthews


In response to “Is this courageous conversation wise?” (Peter St. Onge column, Feb. 2):

Conversation on race in schools needs to include students

Organizers should consider the scope of the proposed Glenn Singleton/CMS project. The study appears to be limited to teachers’ and administrators’ attitudes toward race. The project should include students as well to discover their thoughts about how race influences their view of the world and their place in it. I’m not questioning the need for a “courageous conversation” on race. But if it’s going to be a public conversation, we have to make sure it’s an inclusive one.

Charlie Muller

Huntersville

The sooner Glenn Singleton can start with CMS, the better

The only thing we should be queasy about is not solving the problems in CMS. All of our children deserve better. Our community has to be willing to do a self-examination and be willing to make difficult changes. The question isn’t whether the conversation is wise, it’s how soon can Mr. Singleton start?

Mary Gaertner

Charlotte


In response to “DNC debts still remain” (Feb. 1):

At least one Duke shareholder wants no part of loan to DNC

Is Duke Energy CEO Jim Rogers serious? The DNC’s possible failure to pay back a $10 million line of credit is no big deal and Mr. Rogers sees it as a contribution to the greater good of our community? As a Duke shareholder, I disagree and would expect the company to file a lawsuit against the DNC. I would see forgiving or writing this loan off as essentially a gift to the Democratic Party, which is not acceptable to this shareholder and I bet many others.

Bill Hawthorne

Charlotte


In response to “Don’t use ideology to dumb down N.C.” (Fannie Flono column, Feb. 1):

Pique? Maybe we just disagree about government’s role

Fannie Flono attacks Republicans for what I view as fiscal frugality, calling for accountability in public education and reluctance to embrace a major expansion of the government role in health care. Ms. Flono goes on to explain that opposition to an optional portion of the health care act stems from “… a fit of pique,” apparently dismissing the possibility that it could instead be due to a real difference of opinion about the proper role of government in people’s lives. It is extremely condescending to tell others what motivates them. Please confine your opining to matters of policy, and leave the mind-reading to hucksters on late night TV.

Steven P. Nesbit

Charlotte


Go Rucho, and cut state spending while you’re at it

I have been following Sen. Bob Rucho’s efforts to eliminate the personal and corporate income tax in North Carolina and replace them with a broader sales tax and business license fee. New Hampshire has neither a general sales tax nor an income tax, and its unemployment rate is significantly lower than ours. I applaud Sen. Rucho’s efforts to implement a more efficient tax system, but perhaps we should emulate New Hampshire and focus also on the spending side. With reduced spending we will have less need for tax revenue.

Dennis Soter

Weddington


In response to “N.C. House bill: No bare breasts in public” (Feb. 1, charlotteobserver.com):

There are things that need banning more than breasts

Our legislature meets six months or so out of the year and this is what they are spending their time on? What about “getting out of people’s lives”?

How ironic that Republicans want to ban a breast, but it’s OK for everyone to walk around with an Uzi on their backs.

What’s next? Do museums need to purchase bras and panties for the statues?

Charles Fortanbary

Charlotte

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

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