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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

In response to “City letter propelled stadium agreement” (Feb. 12):

What a mistake; Mayor Foxx showed his hand too soon

Mayor Anthony Foxx’s decision to make first contact with the Panthers regarding stadium renovations is akin to a card player showing his hand to his competitors. The Panthers hadn’t even asked the city for any money, and who knows now if they even would’ve asked.

This is a clear example of a government employee who doesn’t know how the private sector works and doesn’t mind spending other people’s money.

I can hear Jerry Richardson laughing now.

Dan Schmidt

Charlotte

Miami voters get to vote on tax for stadium up-fit; so should we

I was amazed to read that Miami has agreed to a local referendum on the team’s plan to seek tax money for stadium renovations. (“AP Source: Dolphins OK referendum on stadium upgrade,” Feb. 11 Sports).

It raises the possibility that our mayor knew or suspected this as he pushed through a backroom deal before the information surfaced.

It also appears our mayor is asking for a tax increase of about three times the actual cost of renovation. This looks like another back-door tax grab by Foxxy and Friends.

Bill Wallace

Charlotte

Taxpayers shouldn’t foot bill

for Panthers’ poor decisions

Bad player personnel decisions have the Panthers in a salary cap bind! So now the taxpayers are being asked to give $150 million or so to help assuage the pain of these faulty business decisions. Shouldn’t we extend this benefit to all Charlotte’s businesses?

Don Reid

Charlotte

In response to “Political forecast: Hostile, slim chance of unity” (Feb. 11):

GOP, don’t cave on sequester; hold your ground this time

All appropriation bills originate in the U.S. House of Representatives, so the Republican-controlled House has enormous power if they have the fortitude to stand tall.

Recently they have raised taxes to avoid the fiscal cliff, kicked the can down the road on the debt ceiling, and probably will cave on the sequester.

How many times have the Republicans promised to draw the line in the sand and fight the good fight? Their line must be at Myrtle Beach because the tide has washed it away every time.

Jim Cherry

Charlotte


In response to “Airline merger about to take off” (Feb. 11) and related articles:

Airport already among most expensive; merger won’t help

Charlotte flyers, prepare for even more fleecing if the US Airways/American Airlines merger takes place.

Charlotte consistently ranks high among the most expensive airports in the country. Why? Because US Airways has a virtual monopoly in Charlotte.

This monopoly will get even more severe, allowing for even more price-gouging practices.

How is this good for any paying customer? It’s not.

Nick Jackson

Charlotte

Charlotte wise to see downside of US Airways/American merger

Yea Charlotte, for questioning the economy and usefulness of an airport that serves 42 million people annually who are simply passing through.

Yea for questioning the economic argument that says the impact will be a higher standard of living.

Yea for questioning the notion that the money will stay with you and not race immediately out to swell US Airways monopolistic ambitions elsewhere.

Yea for questioning the servile bargain of being a bus stop for a Texas airline.

Yea for not sacrificing the land, clean air and water of your people, your children’s children and their children for any airline monopoly.

You detect the cheat, and will rise up in the majesty of your strength and drive away those who would cheat you.

Grady R. Pitts

Adako, N.C.


In response to “End goal of Congress is to privatize mail delivery” (Feb. 11 Forum):

USPS needs competition; privatizing it is the way to go

The facts don’t support Forum writer Mel Steiner’s allegation that privatizing the mail would result in “price gouging.”

Consider: In 1970 a stamp cost 6 cents. Today it’s 46 cents, meaning postage rates have increased faster than inflation.

In the package delivery business, a free market featuring UPS, DHL, FedEx and others has fostered innovation and price competition, while avoiding the political, bureaucratic and union landmines that hamper the U.S. Postal Service.

Privatized mail service? Bring it on!

Hilton Caldwell

Monroe


In response to “If Boy Scouts rescind ban on gays, that’ll be it for me” (Feb. 8 Forum):

Real message of Scout oath: treat others with respect

There is no need to change the Boy Scout Oath or Promise.

Page 37 in the Scout Handbook (8th edition, 4th printing) says “…to keep myself morally straight.” It explains that morally straight means you live and act and speak in ways that mark you as a boy who will grow up to be a man of good character. You are honest, thoughtful of the rights of others, and faithful to your religious beliefs.

I am still proud to be an Eagle Scout.

Norman Warlick

Cherryville

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

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