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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

There are better uses for stadium renovation money

Is it any wonder our youth struggle to understand what is really important in this world? Look at the example we set.

Do the math on the Panthers’ request: Seventeen years before the stadium will need “renovating” again, 204 home games, assuming we make the playoffs every year and $206 million in public money. That equates to more than $1 million per game in public support for a for-profit organization that pays its employees millions per year. Really?

That money could build over 60,000 wells in impoverished nations and provide simple clean water to millions.

We should be ashamed at the sorry, selfish example we “business leaders” set for our kids as to what really matters.

Robert Bond

Charlotte

Tax other items to pay for Panthers stadium upgrade

Don’t tax diners, many of whom could care less about professional sports, and just tax those with some “skin in the game.”

Put a sales surtax on Panthers team memorabilia – hats, mugs, jerseys, etc. Hit up cable broadcast game subscribers. Tax the ticket holders, especially the corporate skyboxes, and tax the local parking garages during game time.

It’s just not fair and balanced to tax ordinary folks who will never be able to attend a Panthers game – or necessarily want to – for the benefit of the privileged few.

Jan Erik Dormsjo

Charlotte

Can’t ignore jobs generated by team, economic impact on city

I really am getting tired of all the whining from non-Panthers fans concerning the 1-cent prepared food tax.

Guess they haven’t read the economic analysis which states: “The Carolina Panthers conservatively generate $636 million of economic impact and nearly 5,000 jobs for the region annually.”

If you don’t believe me, Google it.

Don Markofski

Mooresville


In response to “Droning on about feelings, and numbing ourselves down” (Feb. 25 Opinion):

Parker’s snarky defensiveness came through loud and clear

Quality and agendas of so-called “sensitivity trainings” vary a lot. But past efforts by those who cared and dared to educate, remedy past wrongs and raise awareness also opened doors of simple fairness for many of us – maybe even columnist Kathleen Parker.

When such a talented and seasoned professional is reduced to the snarky defensiveness of an attention-hungry preteen, maybe some humble self-examination and further maturing on her own part is indicated.

Tish Stoker Signet

Davidson


Maybe Obama administration can learn from movie “Argo”

It was very appropriate for Michelle Obama to appear on the Academy Awards. It exemplifies the Obama administration – sizzle and little substance.

But maybe the Obama administration can create a user guide by learning from “Argo” how to save embassy personnel.

Ed Mesko

Charlotte


In response to Peter St. Onge’s O-pinion blog “The cursive requirement” (Feb. 26 Opinion):

As demands on teachers increase something has to go

As an elementary student I was taught cursive writing using the Palmer method. I’m sure many Observer readers remember the letter cards that were posted in each classroom.

Well done cursive is beautiful, but the purpose of writing is communication. With increasing demands on classroom teaching time I don’t think how you write is as important as what you write.

If the purpose is to be able to read the Declaration of Independence then we should all be learning the Copperplate writing style.

S.C. Isbell

Cornelius


In response to “Gas prices being ignored on both sides of aisle; it must end” (Feb. 25 Forum):

President didn’t drive gas prices, severe recession did

No one likes to pay high prices for gasoline but let’s be fair and accurate here.

The average monthly price for a gallon of gas had risen to an all time high of $4.26 in June 2008 under President George W. Bush.

It was only the severity of the global recession that temporarily brought prices back down under $2. Such was the timing when President Obama took office in January 2009.

Arnie Grieves

Charlotte


In response to “Budget cuts have few fans” (Feb. 25) and related articles:

Austere budget cuts take more courage than Obama team has

Why is it regarded as such a calamity when the government must retrench as companies in the private sector regularly must?

Surviving companies in the private sector either cut budgets and stress austerity when revenues decline, or they fail.

The current administration’s tactic of whining that they need more revenues “or else” is laughable. Unfortunately, cutting budgets and instituting austere measures requires more leadership than the administration has the will to offer.

Dave Ahwesh

Charlotte

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

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