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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

In response to “Bill targets hospital prices” (March 12):

Time to fight hospital prices, exec pay; this bill is first step

Thank you Connie Wilson and N.C. Reps. Marilyn Avila and Justin Burr for introducing a bill to bring down hospital costs. It’s a step in the right direction.

For too long we have faced price gouging for treatment in hospitals for no reason other than big profits.

One only has to look at the combined compensation of the top 10 administrators at Carolinas HealthCare System to realize that $19.5 million between them is unnecessary – as well as costly for patients and taxpayers.

Laura Reich

Matthews

N.C. patients need more flexibility, lower cost options

I have had six outpatient surgeries in recent years – three at hospitals, three at an ambulatory surgery center.

The facilities and service costs were substantially greater at the hospitals. Although the Blue Cross-approved charges were higher at the hospitals, I was nevertheless left with a much higher patient responsibility at the hospitals.

The pattern is obvious.

Patients, insurers and employers deserve more flexible and lower cost outpatient surgery options in North Carolina.

Democrats and Republicans should join together to pass N.C. House Bill 177.

John H. Northey III

Charlotte


In response to “Authority backers get boost” (March 12) and related articles:

I’ve yet to hear 1 good reason for creating an airport authority

I’ve still not heard N.C. lawmakers Robert Rucho or Bill Brawley give a cogent reason for why an airport authority should be created.

If the airport has been so badly managed because of city oversight, why does it have some of the lowest landing fees in the United States?

I suspect the change is more about who is giving money to these legislators, and perhaps personal pique that both have against the city. These are poor reasons for changing something that appears to be working well for the city and region.

I thought by electing Republicans we were going to stop the shenanigans carried out by the Democrats. It seems we just got a new team, playing a new set of shenanigans!

Lynn Daniel

Charlotte


In response to “Pay teachers like our future depends on it” (March 12 Editorial):

Raise N.C. teacher pay or stay at the bottom on many rankings

After more than a decade of being a wife, mom and working full-time in another field, our daughter finished her teaching degree. It was our dream that her graduation would lead to a job offer and she would relocate back to North Carolina.

She received not one, but two offers, one here and one from Virginia which paid 25 percent more, plus she didn’t have to move. Needless to say she is still in Virginia.

Somehow we must better compensate those who teach our young, or we will be left on the bottom rung of many rankings.

Wayne Martin

Matthews


In response to “Fear-mongering obscures fact that deficit is falling” (March 12 Opinion):

Very issues Krugman downplays are at center of current discord

Columnist Paul Krugman says: “There are, of course, longer-term fiscal issues: Rising health costs and an aging population will put the budget under growing pressure over the course of the 2020s. But these longer-run concerns need not determine budget policy right now.”

It is almost exclusively these two very major concerns that are disrupting political accord and budget policy right now. They must be dealt with today, or tomorrow’s deficits could be disastrous.

And Krugman does not further his case by labeling any disagreement with his views as “fiscal fearmongering.”

John V. Doyle

Matthews


In response to “When did MetLife deal go down?” (March 11):

MetLife jobs will cost us far more than area will gain

Gov. Pat McCrory gladly claimed credit for bringing 1,300 MetLife jobs to Charlotte.

Once again we have handed over large tax breaks as incentives to get corporations to move to North Carolina.

What programs will have funding cuts to pay for those tax breaks? More education cuts? Losing our critical pre-K programs? Losing desperately needed highway and light-rail funds?

These jobs will cost North Carolina far more than we will ever gain.

Beverly Tatum

Waxhaw


In response to “Test of power in N.C. hills” (March 11):

Simple solution to transmission line issue in Rutherford foothills

Rather than slicing through the Box Creek Wilderness as the Rutherford Electric Membership Corp. plan calls for, allow the line to run on BCW property but just inside its property line.

This “along the edge” solution will result in a lengthier line and therefore it will be a bit more expensive to build.

However, it will give Rutherford Electric its desired transmission line and at the same time cause minimal damage on the BCW.

Problem solved.

Dan Laurent

Charlotte

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This affects comments on all stories.

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

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