Save Money in this Sunday's paper

comments

With speech, Petraeus back in public eye

By Michael R. Gordon
New York Times

WASHINGTON Since he resigned as director of the CIA last November after acknowledging an extramarital affair, David Petraeus has all but vanished from the national scene.

But in a speech on Tuesday night, Petraeus will seek to open a new chapter in his career – one that carves out a role for himself as a voice on energy, economic and veterans issues and in the private sector.

Petraeus’ speech, which will take place at an event honoring veterans and the ROTC program at the University of Southern California, will begin with an account of the “personal journey” he has undergone since his resignation.

“Needless to say, I join you keenly aware that I am regarded in a different light now than I was a year ago,” Petraeus will say, according to an advance text of his speech that was made available to The New York Times.

“I am also keenly aware that the reason for my recent journey was my own doing,” he will say. “So please allow me to begin my remarks this evening by reiterating how deeply I regret – and apologize for – the circumstances that led me to resign from the CIA and caused such pain for my family, friends and supporters.”

The resignation of Petraeus, one of America’s most decorated four-star generals, marked a stunning end to a meteoric career in which he helped draft the military’s field manual on counterinsurgency; commanded the U.S.-led coalition during the troop “surge” in Iraq; led the military effort in the more fraught Afghan conflict; and became the director of the CIA, where he urged, unsuccessfully, that the White House provide arms to a select cadre of Syrian rebels.

President Barack Obama accepted Petraeus’ resignation on Nov. 9, after Petraeus acknowledged the affair with a biographer, Charlotte resident Paula Broadwell.

Toward the close of the speech, Petraeus plans to return again to his own missteps.

“I know that I can never fully assuage the pain that I inflicted on those closest to me and on a number of others,” he will say. “I can, however, try to move forward in a manner that is consistent with the values to which I subscribed before slipping my moorings and, as best as possible, to make amends to those I have hurt and let down.”

Petraeus will also say that “life doesn’t stop with such a mistake; it can and must go on.”

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

  Read more



Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

  Read more


Quick Job Search
Salary Databases