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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

In response to “The Court gets an opinion on marriage” (March 27 Our View) and other articles:

I’m worried about my rights if gays are allowed to marry

If gay marriage becomes law of the land, people who believe only in one man and one woman marriages will have their rights infringed upon. There will be lawsuits against people who refuse to rent a facility to or photograph the couple. It has already happened.

My right to believe in one man and one woman marriage will not be tolerated. The ramifications are huge.

Ann Marie Lloyd

Charlotte


In response to “Our leaders in Washington must fix the debt problem” (March 27 For the Record) and other articles:

Duke could help economy by investing in natural resources

Does Duke Energy’s Rogers think his show of concern about the national debt will distract Charlotteans from known carcinogens seeping into our water from Duke’s coal ash ponds?

Rogers could protect the economy by getting Duke off fossil fuels like coal, which is “cheap” only if you don’t count “externalities” like cleaning up massive coal-slurry lagoons or cancers caused by arsenic or brain damage caused by mercury.

For the sake of its own shareholders and N.C.’s economy and health, Duke should invest in our state’s abundant solar and wind resources or get out of the way so others can do it.

Beth Henry

Charlotte

So now Duke CEO Rogers is concerned about wastefulness?

Mr. Rogers’ deep concern for the welfare of our nation should instead be focused on his own company, Duke Energy. In his commentary concerning the rising national debt, Rogers uses words such as “wasteful,” “non-sustainable,” and “inefficient.” All are terms that perfectly describe Duke’s latest energy plan being considered right now by the N.C. Utilities Commission.

Are rate hikes for more dirty energy really good for our economy, Mr. Rogers? Are the costs associated with human health really good for our economy? Cleaner energy is always cheaper in the end.

Nikola Taylor

Matthews


In response to “Don’t ban box; employers need to know who they’re hiring” and “A dynamic web presence would help museum’s new mission” (March 27 Forum):

Kudos to letter writers for making points without insults

I thank the Observer for printing opinions from Bill Lane and Phil Kabza today. I take no stance on their opinions and applaud them for providing them without insulting those that disagree with them.

It seems that changing the hearts and minds of others will go much easier without insults. Let’s elevate the discussion.

Chris Schultz

Charlotte


Panthers stadium upgrade will provide plenty of city revenue

At the current real estate tax rate, the $300,000,000 upgrade to Bank of America stadium is approximately $3,750,000 additional property tax out of the Panther’s annual cash flow and into the city’s checkbook.

Coupled with the additional food and beverage tax, this ought to buy the city a lot of “toys” paid for by the Sunday afternoon “Nightmare on Mint Street.” I’ll be there cheering for the team: “Go Queen City!”

Will Granger

Charlotte


In response to “N.C. bill targets hospital prices” (March 28):

Thanks for the wake-up call

on disclosing medical costs

In Phoenix, Ariz., only last week, administrative executives with hospitals were conducting a joint meeting in preparation for justification and public disclosure on salaries and other costs which fall on the shoulders of their patients. The Observer’s recent disclosure on this subject is one more “wake up” call of both clarity and conscience.

Congratulations to Senators Rucho and Brown for stepping up to the plate on this one!

Harold R. Soutier Sr.

Charlotte


For those who signed off on sequestration, a suggestion

Many federal employees will lose 20 percent or more of their expected income by sequestration. It would show true sympathy for folks in that position if all U.S. senators and representatives would each contribute 20 percent of their incomes derived from their salary to soup kitchens and homeless shelters and other assistance organizations in their home states.

Amy Rhodes

Hickory


In response to “Who will save whom?” (March 26 Viewpoint) and “This also grates on ears” (March 27 Forum):

How about a crusade for grammar, not handwriting?

I teach English grammar each day to three classes of third graders who have become “grammar spies.”

The biggest mistake they have found, while listening to their elders, is with the usage of good and well. Ask anyone how they are doing and listen to their response. Most people respond, “I’m good.” I tell my students, “Yes, you are a good person, but you are doing well.”

I would much rather see a “crusade” in North Carolina for teaching grammar than cursive writing! Handwriting doesn’t define one’s education, but when the mouth is opened all doubt is taken away.

Barbara Carpenter

Oakboro

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

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This affects comments on all stories.

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

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