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Voucher programs redefine public schooling

By Fernanda Santos and Motoko Rich
New York Times

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  • Across the country, nearly all teachers get passing grades
  • North Carolina, too

    Private school voucher efforts are gaining momentum in North Carolina.

    A House bill filed this month would offer payments for disabled students to attend private school. Up to $6,000 a year would be available to students who leave the public schools or are ready to enroll in kindergarten or first grade.

    More legislative proposals for private school vouchers are likely coming. House Speaker Thom Tillis said this year that he expects one or two bills that would allow tax money to be used to help public school students attend private schools.



PHOENIX A growing number of lawmakers across the country are taking steps to redefine public education, shifting the debate from the classroom to the pocketbook.

Instead of simply financing a traditional system of neighborhood schools, legislators and some governors are taking steps to funnel public money directly to families, who would be free to choose the kind of schooling they believe is best for their children, be it public, charter, private, religious, online or at home.

On Tuesday, after a legal fight, the Indiana Supreme Court upheld the state’s voucher program as constitutional. This month, Gov. Robert Bentley of Alabama signed tax-credit legislation so that families can take their children out of failing public schools and enroll them in private schools, or at least in better-performing public schools.

In Arizona, which already has a tax-credit scholarship program, the Legislature has broadened eligibility for education savings accounts. And in New Jersey, Gov. Chris Christie, in an effort to circumvent state lawmakers who have repeatedly defeated voucher bills, has inserted $2 million into his budget so low-income children can obtain private school vouchers.

Proponents say tax-credit and voucher programs offer families a way to escape failing public schools. But critics warn that by drawing money away from public schools, such programs weaken a system left vulnerable after years of crippling state budget cuts – while showing little evidence that students actually benefit.

“This movement is doing more than threaten the core of our traditional public school system,” said Timothy Ogle, executive director of the Arizona School Boards Association. “It’s pushing a national policy agenda embraced by conservatives across states that are receptive to conservative ideas.”

Currently, 17 states offer 33 programs that allow parents to use taxpayer money to send their children to private schools, according to the American Federation for Children, a nonprofit advocate for school vouchers as well as tax-credit scholarship programs that give individuals or corporations tax reductions if they donate to state-run scholarship funds.

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