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Michael Graves leads F.O.O.D. event at Mint Museum

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    F.O.O.D. (Food, Objects, Objectives, Design) continues through July 7. Michael Graves’ lecture is at 7 p.m. April 25, at the Mint Museum Uptown. The conference is 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. April 26.

    Cost: The lecture is $5 for members, $15 for nonmembers and free for students. The lecture and conference, with box lunch, are $60 for members, $100 for nonmembers. The conference alone is $85 for nonmembers.

    Registration: mintmuseum.org/happenings.



When you have a museum exhibit called “F.O.O.D.,” you can make it a feast. So feast your mind on the next part of the Mint Museum’s food-focused exhibit:

A talk by Michael Graves, the “star-chitect” of everyday objects, followed by a daylong conference with a star-packed roster of food and design experts. Panelists include writer-chef-instructor Peter Reinhart, culinary historian Jessica Harris, Darra Goldstein, the founder of Gastronomica magazine, architect Ken Gaylord, and designers Matteo Bologna of Mucca Design and Andrea Trimarchi and Simone Farresin of FormaFantasma in the Netherlands.

“This is an opportunity to bring major figures to talk around food and design,” says Cheryl Palmer, the Mint’s director of learning and engagement. “It’s a once-in-a-lifetime kind of moment.”

It’s also an affordable one: Graves’ lecture, on the evening of April 25, is $5 for museum members, $15 for nonmembers and free for students. Or nonmembers can pay $100 and get the Graves lecture, the conference and a box lunch.

That’s intentional, says Palmer. The museum wants to keep the cost down so the most number of people can come. She expects a mix of food lovers, design professionals and people who just want to be engaged with both.

Palmer says the conference won’t be stand-and-point lectures. The plan is for the panel to use the F.O.O.D. show to look at things like the globalization of our pantries and the way our family dynamics change what’s on our tables.

The whole event starts, though, with Graves, known for bringing high-design to everyday objects such as tea pots and kitchen timers. After being paralyzed by an illness, Graves challenged designers and architects to make objects usable and accessible.

“More than anyone else, Graves has changed the field by championing good design as essential to everyday life, and by creating objects that are accessible, intuitive, functional and beautiful,” says Palmer.

Purvis: 704-358-5236.
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