Briefly, April 28
comments
Sunday, Apr. 28, 2013

Briefly, April 28

Charlotte

Bike event: The 13th annual BIKE! Charlotte event will take place April 26-May 12. It’s 17 days of bicycle-related events encouraging the use of bikes for transportation and recreation. The calendar is online and includes Cycle Charlotte, the family-friendly bike ride with three supported bike routes from South End to uptown. All the events are free. www.bikecharlotte.org.

CATS routes: During construction on Trade Street, CATS bus routes and vehicular traffic will be affected. Trade Street between College Street and Caldwell Street will be closed until May 21, and there will be only one access to the Charlotte Transportation Center uptown, causing delays with bus schedules. Several routes will be unable to serve stops on Trade Street between Church and College streets. The list of adjustments can be found online at www.ridetransit.org.

University City

Health festival: The University City YMCA will host Healthy Kids Day 10 a.m.-2 p.m. May 4 at 8100 Old Mallard Creek Road. The event is geared toward kids and teaching them healthy ways to enjoy summer. There will be a one-mile fun run at 10:30 a.m.; it costs $10 per runner. The event also will have entertainment, bounce houses and other activities. www.ymcacharlotte.org.

Town hall meeting: Charlotte City District 4 Councilman Michael Barnes will host a town hall meeting 6:30-8:30 p.m. May 16 at the IKEA community room, 8300 IKEA Blvd. City Manager Ron Carlee, representatives from the N.C. and Charlotte departments of transportation, and three new police division captains from northeast Charlotte will be in attendance. Barnes will discuss updates on the Blue Line Extension, the widening of Interstate 85, and completion of Interstate 485 and other projects slated for the area in 2013.

Grant awarded: The Department of Energy has awarded UNC Charlotte researcher Deborah Strumsky and her team $949,131 as part of the department’s SunShot Initiative, which is investing $9 million in seven projects nationwide. The team will explore how solar technologies in the past have been influenced by improvement in related technologies, public and private research and development investments, and public policy initiatives. The team will construct a network, called a technology ecosystem, to forecast and influence technological progress.

The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

  Read more