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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

In response to “Rare defeats put hospitals on offensive” (April 27):

Lawmakers should stop hospitals’ monopoly of services

The people who run hospitals should be ashamed. They buy up all the competitors, buy doctors’ offices and clinics, then raise their prices, pay the execs millions, send bill collectors after people who can’t afford health insurance... and now don’t want any competition?

This is ludicrous! The hospitals waste more than 30 percent of revenues as reported by the Wall Street Journal. The consolidation of the hospital system needs to be regulated. No hospital system should control more than half the services provided in a trading area, a county or city.

Tom Barringer

Charlotte


In response to “McCrory replaces elections board” (April 27):

Gov. McCrory’s purge of Elections Board was right move

Though not a fan of Gov. Pat McCrory, I do applaud his move to purge the State Board of Elections. After 100 years of General Assembly control by Democrats, N.C. government is full of cronies and waste, and the BOE is no exception. They were very protective of the past few eastern Democratic governors; it’s time for some new blood. And they definitely should proceed with the investigation of the sweepstakes political contributions.

Floyd Prophet

Kannapolis


Allowing weapons on university campuses poses safety risks

The writer is chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte:

Most people understand that the constitutional right to keep and bear arms is limited in some circumstances for public safety. Generally, we don’t allow holders of concealed carry permits to transport their weapons into airports and large public sporting events. The faculty, staff, students and visitors on our university campuses should enjoy the same protections.

Our concern is that legislation such as HB 937 makes firearms more accessible, even if “locked away” in automobiles. That makes everyone less safe. Campus law enforcement and mental health professionals review on a regular basis the words and actions of individuals who could represent a threat to themselves or to others. Extending the range of acceptable places for concealed weapons to be carried simply increases the potential risk those individuals present to our campus. In the end, the duty to protect the safety and welfare of our students is on the shoulders of our administration and campus safety officials.

I hope our voices are heard.

Philip L. Dubois

Charlotte


In response to “President to name Foxx to Cabinet post” (April 29):

List Mayor Foxx’s qualifications for transportation secretary

Now tell me, what experience does Mayor Anthony Foxx have that qualifies him to be the Secretary of Transportation? Another fine example of our federal government at work.

Roy Brown

Matthews

Will there be payback to state for moves against Mayor Foxx?

So, Gov. Pat McCrory, N.C. Sen. Bob Rucho and the gang put Foxx in his place by taking the airport away from the city and threatening to cut funds for mass transit in Charlotte. Now Foxx, as Secretary of Transportation, will be the final approval authority for all federal transportation funds, airport, mass transit and roads. Hopefully, North Carolina will not pay the penalty for McCrory’s and Rucho’s arrogance and hubris. If we do, we should make a few personnel changes in the next election.

John Mason

Matthews

In response to “To keep buyers away from the Internet, lower N.C. tax rate” (April 28 Forum):

Feds have nothing to gain with Internet sales tax; states do

Forum writer Hans Nohr is accusing the “occupant of the White House to, in his drive to run up taxes anywhere and everywhere, hit the Internet.” How is collecting state sales tax for the individual states going to benefit the federal government? This is an example of irrational thinking, just to get at the president. It is, after all, only fair if brick and mortar stores have to collect sales tax, online stores should also.

Elaine Loutzenheiser

Black Mountain


In response to “Voter photo ID is a common-sense step for North Carolina” (April 28 For the Record):

Tillis’ voter ID argument is flawed all the way through

There are several flaws to Thom Tillis’ argument. He first equates our constitutional right to vote, a vital right for our democracy, to the need to show an ID to rent a car. The comparison is almost comical. Secondly, the voter ID idea came from ALEC, a conservative states’ rights group, and not from public demand. Voting abuses that an ID law purports to solve have been minuscule.

Voter ID is a partisan guise to make the exercise of the right to vote onerous for many North Carolinians and makes no sense – especially common sense – at all.

John H. Clark

Charlotte

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This affects comments on all stories.

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

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