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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

In response to “The peril of calling something wrong” (May 4 Peter St. Onge column):

If you don’t vote your beliefs, what’s the point having them?

Peter St. Onge’s column was well thought-out and I appreciated his accurate depiction of what Chris Broussard didn’t say. I was right there with him – all the way until he said it was bigotry to “use your beliefs to advocate for discrimination, such as laws banning same-sex marriage.”

If you’re unwilling to vote your beliefs, your belief is like any shallow person’s – one inch thick and a mile wide. That doesn’t make you a bigot, it makes you a believer in the Bible.

L. B. Pope

Mint Hill

Thanks for the column, but Chris Broussard is no bigot

I was pleasantly amazed to read the column defending Chris Broussard, the ESPN sportscaster pilloried for stating honestly his views on homosexuality. My only regret is your opening line, “Today we defend the bigot.” As you point out later, Broussard did not exhibit the hatred and intolerance that would be required to justify that label.

Steven P. Nesbit

Charlotte

Broussard identifies other sins, but doesn’t speak out til now

I also do not share Mr. Broussard’s beliefs. I will defend his right to express them regardless of whether I agree.

Yet Mr. Broussard cleverly invoked his religion as a shield of moral outrage; a thing separate from himself that justifies a belief that many increasingly disagree with. But even if we can accept his belief based on his religious tenets, that begs the question: Does Mr. Broussard reserve his religious outrage only for homosexuals?

I find it fair to characterize his remarks as intolerant or homophobic when he uses his religion to sermonize and cast judgment on one particular class of the public, as opposed to other “sinners,” especially when he judges them not for what they do but simply for who they are.

Chris Cantu

Charlotte


Relax, Republicans, Mel Watt is a big friend to big banks

Democrats who hope, and Republicans who dread, that Mel Watt’s appointment is a sign the administration has suddenly decided to aid bank victims, are both kidding themselves.

It’s hard to decide which is worse: Rep. Robert Pittenger blaming the economic collapse on poor people who somehow duped the world’s most powerful industry into allowing them to buy “houses they couldn’t afford,” or Watt, who introduced Dodd-Frank then promptly quit attending hearings after receiving bank campaign cash, saying they didn’t matter because the Republicans “weren’t listening.”

So Democrats blame Republicans and Republicans blame poor people, while both keep bowing down to bankers who laugh all the way to the Fed, which continues to pay them $85 billion in our taxes each month.

Rebecca Lynne Martin

Charlotte


Obama finally leads a bit on entitlements; back him up

President Obama offers to support a small reduction in the growth of entitlements, something necessary to the nation’s financial future, and gets attacked from the left. MoveOn.org and Democracy in America, two groups obviously focused on free stuff, are not interested in the future of the country except on their terms. Those terms are transfer payments from the young who are working to the old and others who are not.

President Obama has made a move in the right direction. For us to get our financial house in order, everyone will have to lose a little. Opposing the president when he leads is not the way.

Lewis Guignard

Crouse


In response to “S.C. nullification bill pushes N.C. off stage” (May 6 editorial):

South Carolina might put this spin on Emma Lazarus

Down in Myrtle Beach they are always thinking of that next attraction. I heard a replica of the Statue of Liberty was on the list. It might say:

“Give Washington your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,

The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.

Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to Washington,

I lift my lamp beside the golden door and pray for healthy vacationers year-round!”

Bolyn McClung

Pineville


Golf fans can teach you all you want – and then some

While at the Wells Fargo Championship, an amazing thing happened to me: I learned everything there is to know about golf.

That’s because the people surrounding me knew everything there is to know about golf.

They knew the proper stance, the proper grip, the proper swing. They knew about fades and draws and hooks and slices. They knew how to put spin on a ball; they knew how not to. They knew all about the effect wind is likely to have on a ball in flight. They knew all about different types of golf course grasses and how to care for them.

The people around me were a veritable Google of golf information, and were anxious to share it with all, even the dullards who just wanted to watch the proceedings without commentary.

Russ Dymond

Charlotte

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

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