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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

In response to “Family illustrates gaps in aid” and “2 switch votes, and city OKs streetcar” (May 29):

Use streetcar ‘surplus’ to aid homeless; curb other spending

Charlotte has more than 4,000 homeless residents. Yet, on Tuesday City Council committed to spend $63 million in “surplus” funds for the streetcar, while awaiting a federal grant to complete the project.

And there will likely be another property tax increase to help fund the $816 million capital plan.

How about city leaders say “no” to federal spending to support the streetcar and “no” to a property tax increase to support the capital plan?

Instead, use the $63 million “surplus” to aid the homeless.

Amy Pharr

Charlotte

In response to “2 switch votes, and city OKs streetcar” (May 29):

Foxx comment about streetcar, 13th amendment out of place

The political rhetoric by City Council members had no place in the vote for the streetcar.

Was it a vote for the streetcar or an opportunity for political speeches and for dividing the city’s east and west sides from the north and south?

Since the 1960s our great city has worked hard at equality and better lives for all citizens. Mayor Foxx’s comment comparing the streetcar vote to passage of the 13th Amendment was out of place.

All areas of our great city are a mixture of all races and cultures. We need to go forward, not backwards. Projects should be awarded based on merit.

Wilna Eury

Charlotte


I-77 commuters overtaxed as is; toll road only makes it worse

Our state legislature has 170 members, the majority of whom represent rural communities. But the majority of the state’s revenue comes from the urban areas.

The result is that rural legislators have a powerful say in how urban legislators spend our taxes.

Lake Norman commuters, who contribute $12 million in gas taxes per year, will be victims of this disparity, while commuters in rural areas will continue to be beneficiaries.

Interstate 77 and its overtaxed commuters will be the first victims of this unfair situation unless our urban legislators demonstrate they have the backbone to represent their constituents and fix this problem.

Vince Winegardner

Davidson


In response to “N.C. literacy test rule needs to finally go” (May 28 Editorial):

Disabled, elderly also hurt by literacy rule; get rid of it

The N.C. literacy rule is not fair to disabled citizens or the elderly.

At this point, it is no longer about preventing African-Americans from voting, as education is available to all. It’s about giving the disadvantaged their chance to speak for themselves.

I thought we were supposed to have “liberty and justice for all.”

Or at least that’s what, as citizens, we are entitled to.

Zain Murdock

Charlotte


In response to “Proposal to tax owner of hybrid cars is counterproductive” (May 29 Forum) and related articles:

Electric cars not as ‘green’ as owners would like to think

If I read Forum writer Jay Cohen correctly, he wants us to help pay the way of those who buy “green” vehicles.

Owners of such cars get a feeling of smug superiority while making little difference in climate change. Recent studies show that in areas that rely on coal-produced electricity green cars have nearly an identical lifetime carbon footprint as a modern conventional fuel car.

To top it off, owners of “green” cars want us to give them a tax credit when they buy it.

But we “typical Republicans,” are the “evil, toxic” ones? Well.

Bob Buch

Concord

Taxing hybrids just another bout of flawed logic from GOP

The GOP proposal to tax hybrid and electric vehicles shows once again that they do not really oppose taxes, since they’ll happily tax people they oppose.

Receipts from gas taxes are down, so instead of raising the tax slightly or imposing a tax for miles driven, they target a small number of consumers who are doing the right thing by cutting consumption of foreign oil and reducing greenhouse emissions.

Instead of encouraging such good civic behavior, they propose penalizing it.

Another GOP fail, and shame on us for voting these logically challenged rascals in.

John Bird

Charlotte


In response to Kay McSpadden’s “Working for common good” (May 25 Viewpoint):

S.C. must muster political courage to fix school funding

Right-on to Kay McSpadden for her recent column on South Carolina school funding.

I have never pretended to understand economics, but even I could have told S.C. legislators that basing school funding on the sales tax rather than real estate taxes was short-sighted.

Sales tax is fine when the economy is booming. But when the economy tanks – as it did – full funding is impossible.

I grew up in New Jersey so I am familiar with outrageously high real estate taxes.

I’m consistently impressed at how low my real estate taxes are in South Carolina by comparison, and how many services they provide – except for the schools.

Catherine M. Sullivan

Rock Hill

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

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