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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

Streetcars were eliminated for good reason; don’t revive them

When I was a child we had streetcars in Charlotte. I rode them.

Why were they removed? There was not enough room on the streets for streetcars, automobiles, trucks, etc.

We now have thousands more automobiles, trucks and buses than we did in the 1930s and ’40s. Congestion is much greater.

But the Charlotte City Council has voted to spend millions to return streetcars to Charlotte.

Streetcars are a novelty. What a waste!

Katherine Moyle

Charlotte


In response to “Tax plan closes loopholes” (May 31):

Fuzzy language hides real issues in N.C. tax plans

Can we get our terminology straight on taxes for a change?

There is no “cost” to the state for not taxing something.

The only “costs” in the state’s tax equation are associated with the state’s spending of the tax revenues and the fact that taxes are a “cost” to the taxpayers!

If states – and Feds – communicated their budget plans using proper accounting principles, citizens could better understand budgetary issues.

Matthew Wall

Charlotte


Plan to tax ‘green’ cars falls short; try more equitable plan

The N.C. Senate proposal to tax hybrid and electric cars seems simultaneously too broad and too narrow.

Clearly, a hybrid owner who drives 20,000 miles a year and buys hundreds of gallons of gasoline has paid his or her fair share of the gas tax. And what about owners of conventional cars who only drive a few thousand miles a year?

Let’s get right to the heart of the problem and simply institute a minimum yearly gasoline purchase. Anything less, and you’re subject to the GOP’s new tax.

That way, everyone has to do their part, regardless of what they drive or whether they drive at all. Surely no one will complain about that.

Will Stancil

Belmont

‘Ideologues’ in Raleigh wrong to focus on taxing hybrid cars

I can’t do a thing about my taxes being used to make up for lost revenues from millionaires’ off-shore tax havens or subsidize those who have no modicum of personal responsibility.

But my work involves a lot of travel, so the one thing I can do is drive a hybrid car that will haul me around the country at a rate of 50-plus mpg.

Now, because the current pack of arrogant, ignorant ideologues who control the N.C. legislature would be happier if I drove a Lincoln Navigator, they want to impose a tax on hybrids.

When are these legislators going to do what they campaigned on and create jobs?

Ron Brendle

Charlotte


In response to “The deceptive choice of school vouchers” (May 30 Editorial):

I applaud Observer’s forceful stance on school vouchers

Thank you for making a clear and strong declaration against school vouchers amid continued aggressive attempts by some in the N.C. legislature to divert public education funding.

School vouchers are nothing but a wolf in sheep’s clothing and folks need to recognize them as such. Please continue to stand strongly for public schools. They are part of the fabric of our great nation and they are foundational to our achievements.

C.M. Lutterloh

Hickory

Vouchers would help ease achievement gap in N.C.

The writer is media relations director for Parents for Educational Freedom in North Carolina

The May 29 editorial “The deceptive choice of school vouchers” descriptively paints a broad brush over those who believe using funds to help underserved students receive the critical academic help they need is somehow assuming that our traditional public schools are a complete failure.

The Opportunity Scholarship Act expands educational options for poor families who need them the most while providing numerous safeguards, such as financial audits, national standardized tests and reporting requirements for participating schools to ensure our tax dollars are spent wisely and efficiently.

We simply cannot afford to double-down on the status quo because it is convenient for institutions, but not for low-income children.

Solving the achievement gaps between rich and poor kids deserves a 21st century solution.

Stan Chambers

Raleigh


In response to “Obamacare will bankrupt Democratic-leaning states first” (May 27 Forum):

Preventive focus of Obamacare will save money in long run

It is shortsighted and unrealistic to insist that those states resisting the expansion of Medicaid will save money.

Health problems of the poor will continue and become more expensive to treat – at public expense in emergency rooms – once the problems inevitably reach crisis level.

Aside from the Gospel imperatives to care for the least of our brethren, it simply makes economic sense to address more of these health issues before they reach crisis status and to establish preventive measures while they can make a difference.

Janet Taylor

Lincolnton


Smithfield should worry about how animals treated in China

There’s an ugly appropriateness that China, known for its cruelty to animals, should take over the operations of killing animals. Just when you thought the pigs could suffer no more than they already do, enter the dragon.

Sue Perna

Wakefield, Va.

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

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This affects comments on all stories.

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

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