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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

In response to “Singled out for Beazer’s sins” (June 2):

Beazer employee needs to look in the mirror to find blame

We read the article on Janette Parker’s trials and tribulations of being “caught up” in the Beazer mortgage swindle with wonderment. She wonders how God could allow this to happen to her.

We’ll tell you how it happened: Mrs. Parker didn’t attend her Baptist Church on the Sunday when the sermon topic was Morals and Ethics. Also she skipped the Sunday that the minister talked about personal responsibilities and further she wasn’t there when the congregation was warned about allowing greed to replace God.

No doubt she took the fall for other guilty “higher ups” but no way was she duped into believing that what she was doing was morally and ethically right and certainly not legal. She was blinded by $250,000 and now she wants to blame God for her failed eyesight.

Carole & Ron Drake

Charlotte


In response to “Fuel or fair: The electric car question” (June 1 Our View):

Flat tax on hybrid cards is based on incorrect assumption

The Republican-led N.C. legislature now wants to tax all hybrid vehicles the same amount. But not all hybrid cars and SUVs get the same gas mileage; the implicit assumption of the legislature is that hybrid owners pay less in gas taxes than non-hybrid vehicle owners. But this is far from true, and to charge a flat tax is deeply unfair.

A better, related solution would be to tax vehicles based on their EPA-rated MPG – the higher your MPG, the higher your road tax.

But then we should not forget the environmental effects of those low MPG SUVs, and those vehicles should be charged a pollution tax for the impact they have on our air.

Chris Paradise

Huntersville


In response to “More of what we eat is from China” (June 2):

Smithfield purchase reminds us: We don’t need meat

An Iowa pork grower’s only lament about the takeover of Smithfield Foods is the fear that Americans may go hungry if a food shortage occurs. The fallacy perpetuated through advertising is that most of us need meat to survive. Most people do not need animal protein for optimal health if eating a balanced plant-based diet.

The sale of Smithfield will continue the corporate domination of unhealthy foods and increase the already ghastly treatment of intelligent animals.

Sarah Dorenfeld

Charlotte


In response to “Trimming around the edges of tax reform won’t work; be bold” (June 2 For the Record):

Rucho offers same failed policies but calls it ‘tax reform’

Sen. Bob Rucho calls on the legislature to “be bold” in reforming taxes in North Carolina.

His prescription? Cut income and corporate taxes while raising the sales tax and charging it on more items. What does this actually translate into? Lowering taxes on the wealthy while increasing them on the poor and the middle class.

We have already seen what unpaid-for tax cuts lead to on the national level: high budget deficits, increased income inequality, lower social mobility, and higher unemployment.

The people of North Carolina (despite Rucho’s many votes to cut education spending) are too smart not to see through this recycled rhetoric.

James P. Thomas Jr.

Charlotte

If Rucho is in favor of it, then most of us should beware

Whatever Bob Rucho is for, it’s got to be bad for the 99 percenters. In some cases, it’s probably bad for most of the 1 percenters, too.

Ronald Honeycutt

Mount Gilead


Sequester cuts having an impact on common people

Last month Congress acted to keep the airports running smoothly despite the sequester cuts, responding to their travel needs and those of the more wealthy travelers. Action is needed to take care of the rest of the sequester.

Memorial Day weekend I traveled the Blue Ridge Parkway, and I found campgrounds closed, grass not mowed, etc., and I learned that they had major budget cuts due to the sequester. People lost their jobs.

Sequester cuts also affect recipients of Meals on Wheels and other programs.

Congress, you need to stand up for the common people.

Pat Bullard

China Grove


In response to “Moving toward demo” (May 31):

City missed a smart solution

for Eastland Mall property

With very little foresight by City Hall, the Eastland Mall property should have been seen as the perfect place to build the new Knights stadium. Now all we’ll have is a low-attendance ballpark in uptown plus an empty 80-acre site in an area that could use some revitalization. Another golden opportunity missed.

John Marszalek

Charlotte

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This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

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