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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

In response to “Take our Bad Bill quiz – if you dare” (June 8 editorial):

November 2014 can’t come quickly enough for this voter

What kind of knuckle-dragging, dim-brained, anti-education, dog-hating, pro-smoking, control freak, asbestos protecting, gun-loving, in-the-pockets-of-business idiots did we elect to the legislature? Of course, they did try to protect their own gifts from lobbyists.

Let them draw new local school board lines? Can we have a do-over?

Kay Ballenger

Charlotte


In response to “Senate immigration bill a job killer” (June 9 Viewpoint):

To have more jobs in U.S., attract best human capital

In reading Mark Thies’ column, I found myself pondering what really creates jobs in a global 21st century.

Positions in farming or mining or health care and hospitality services are tied to location. However, knowledge-based positions can be filled virtually with Internet connectivity and a large enough qualified talent pool. Having more such jobs in the U.S. requires having more incumbents who want to live and work here. It is time to focus on attracting and retaining the best human capital – rather than on building and exporting it through a restrictive immigration system.

Mary H. Bruce

Charlotte


Privacy is long gone, and Snowden is a true patriot

While former CIA employee Edward Snowden faces life in prison for the NSA leaks, I applaud his actions as those of a whistle-blowing patriot.

The disclosures illustrate three vital points. First, bureaucracies have a driving tendency to expand, as NSA spying has since the PATRIOT Act was passed in October 2001. Second, policy overreach and misconduct can most readily be justified by the “appeal to higher loyalties” technique in the case of alleged national security. Third, we are at a unique point in our history where we lack a loyal opposition on national security matters. President Obama has expanded Bush programs that Sen. Obama decried.

The Democrats support their kind, in part out of fear of being tarred as “weak on terrorism.” The Republicans ignore privacy issues altogether in their assertions that the administration isn’t going far enough. Such is the stuff that tyranny is made of.

Robert F. Salvia

Charlotte


Surely, there are Republicans who think legislature errs

After joining the Moral Monday gathering in Raleigh last week, I urge political parties to come together. I’ll bet there are Republicans cringing at the damage being done to North Carolina. De-funding prenatal care? Cuts in pre-K and teacher aides? Tax increases on groceries? Mean-spirited voting laws? All of us who love our state must learn what’s going on, then fight this nonsense together.

Barbara Conrad

Charlotte


The real story: Universities’ exploitation of athletes

The cat-and-mouse game between the press and UNC-Chapel Hill is an amusing side show to the real issue in college sports – the shameless economic exploitation of young athletes by big time universities running development leagues for the NFL and NBA.

The “educators” are able to limit prices for talent to athletic “scholarships” through the NCAA cartel. The athletes lack even basic insurance against career-ending injuries and must beat long odds for a professional payday. The ruthless competition for the few professional jobs leaves many academically challenged football and basketball athletes with little time for traditional classes. Meanwhile NCAA member-employers dance around the issue like an NFL running back celebrating a touchdown.

Why shouldn’t they dance? They are making a killing off their low-paid workers.

Ed Hinson

Charlotte


In response to “CEO pay falls; perks on the rise” (June 9):

In CEO pay story, I notice the lack of faces of color…

As I scanned the article and looked at the photos of the CEOs in your story, I was distressed to see that not one face was that of a person of color. While many will argue that the South is changing and the “old ways” are being left in the past, there are still areas where there is no change and probably won’t be. I am sure there are many people of color who are qualified but the “South of the Past” has kept them from making it to the top.

Eddie Simelton

Charlotte

… And only one woman of 55 shows glass ceiling is intact

It seems that the proverbial glass ceiling is pretty much intact for North Carolina’s largest companies. Of the 55 CEOs who led the state’s 50 biggest publicly traded companies in 2012, there was exactly one woman, Carolyn Logan of Salix Pharmaceuticals. In the 21st century, in an age where girls are told they “can do anything boys can do,” why is female representation in executive leadership positions so minute it seems to be more of a statistical error than an equal share?

Rachel Pomerantz

Matthews

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This affects comments on all stories.

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

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