Save Money in this Sunday's paper

comments

First 90s of year arrive in wake of storms

Cleanup from Monday’s powerful thunderstorms will take place in the hottest weather so far this year in the Charlotte region.

Meteorologists say temperatures will approach the 90-degree mark Tuesday, then push into the low and possibly mid 90s Wednesday and Thursday.

The warmest reading so far this year in Charlotte was 87 degrees on May 31, but forecasters say sunshine and high pressure will bring hot weather into the area for a few days. A cold front, possibly accompanied by more severe weather, will usher in more seasonal temperatures Friday for the weekend.

Andrew Kimball, of the Weather Service’s office in Greer, S.C., said computer models have indicated for a few days that Wednesday’s high temperatures could vault into the upper 90s, fed by high pressure over the Southern Plains. But Kimball says forecasters are scaling back the predicted high temperature a few degrees.

Overcast skies Tuesday morning began breaking shortly after sunrise, marking an end -- at least temporarily -- to the stormy weather that had dominated the area for several days.

Monday’s thunderstorms delivered a considerable amount of wind damage. At one point in the late afternoon, more than 15,000 Duke Energy customers were without power locally.

Authorities reported at least two houses were hit by falling trees. A family of four was displaced when a tree landed on a house in the 6800 block of Fieldvale Place, near the Yorkmont community off South Tryon Street. The American Red Cross provided help for that family.

Randolph Road was blocked by a downed tree during part of the evening commute, and authorities scrambled to deal with several other fallen trees in the Charlotte area.

It was the same story elsewhere in the region.

In Rowan County, strong winds blew down several trees and blocked roads southwest of Rockwell. Tree damage and winds gusting to 60 mph were reported south of Lake Wylie in York County. Officials in Concord reported a number of trees and power lines blown down east of U.S. 29.

In Caldwell County, storms in the morning damaged several buildings near Oak Hill Elementary School. One tree caused an estimated $5,000 damage to the school. Another tree landed on a house on Oak Hill School Road, causing damage estimated at $30,000 on both floors of the structure. No injuries were reported.

The good news was that Monday afternoon’s storms moved quickly and didn’t cause the type of flooding problems that have plagued the region for more than a week.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Utilities officials say heavy rain Saturday and Sunday caused a spill of about 2,500 gallons at the McAlpine Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant on Lancaster Highway in Pineville. A plant operator discovered the spill and fixed the problem about 10 minutes after it started.

Officials blamed the spill on heavy rain sending water into the sewer system.

The same thing happened in Morganton, where about 120,000 gallons of sewage overflow -- mostly rain water -- spilled into Hunting Creek and the Catawba River. The spill occurred at the Vine Arden Road sewage treatment plant, according to town official Ronnie Suttles.

Water Resources Director Brad Boris said he doesn’t expect any adverse impact from the spills, because they were mostly rain water. Residents do not have to boil drinking water, he said.

Steve Lyttle: 704-358-6107.
Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

  Read more



Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

  Read more


Quick Job Search
Salary Databases
Your 2 Cents
Share your opinion with our Partners
Learn More