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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

In response to “Posting big numbers for UNCC” (June 12):

I see no reason to celebrate Jerry Richardson’s generosity

Let me get this straight: Charlotte taxpayers give a billionaire $90 million so he can make capital improvements to his business, then the billionaire turns around and gives $10 million to UNC Charlotte. And we’re supposed to celebrate the billionaire’s generosity?

That would be an absolute joke if it weren’t so sad.

No wonder all of those commuters were tired of being Charlotte taxpayers and left the city.

Andrew Thiel

Charlotte

UNCC, I have a better plan for stadium name, Jerry’s $10M

It’s ironic that months after Jerry Richardson pleaded with City leaders for funding for stadium improvements, saying in effect that he couldn’t afford to fund them himself, he found the resources to get UNC Charlotte to name its stadium after him.

This man’s hubris is exceeded only by his vanity and desire for self-aggrandizement.

Rather than naming the new stadium after Richardson, I suggest UNCC donate the funds to the City to offset Bank of America Stadium renovation costs. Then, name the UNCC stadium 49ers Stadium or something more appropriate for a publicly funded university.

Ray Otstott

Charlotte


In response to “City OKs budget and tax hike” (June 11):

Time for Charlotte renters to carry more of the tax burden

It’s time that city and county government stop putting the burden of paying for capital projects on homeowners and commercial property owners.

Some of us residential owners are older and on fixed incomes. An increase of 7.25 percent from the City and an additional increase from the County, along with increased water, sewer and storm water fees, puts an undue burden on real estate owners.

Renters, who also benefit from all of the proposed improvements including those for schools, should share more in the burden through a rent tax, which could be collected monthly by their landlords. We do not need elected officials who lack imagination and always take the easy way out of any financial dilemma.

Raymond M. Conforti

Charlotte


In response to “Carbon monoxide linked to hotel deaths” (June 11):

Boy’s death could have been prevented; someone must pay

Someone in the state medical examiner’s office should be going to jail on charges stemming from allowing a little boy to die.

Upon reading the article about the elderly couple found dead in the motel months ago, I immediately suspected carbon monoxide poisoning. So did everyone else I discussed it with.

And those whose job it is waited this long to perform carbon monoxide tests, allowing innocent people to stay there? Unbelievable!

Fred Long

Charlotte

Use cell technology to prevent deaths like those in Boone

We have placed men on the moon and have split the atom. Is it that hard to develop a cell phone with a built in smoke/CO2 detector? How many lives could be saved?

David Merritt

Rock Hill


Minimal loss of privacy is price we pay for security today

We citizens should have more confidence in the way this administration and the previous one handled our defense against radicalism all over the world.

For the first time in our history, we are fighting an enemy who has no government, no uniform, army, navy or air force, leaving us to contend in a far different way than previous wars.

Monitoring communications via cell phones, Internet traffic, cameras, drones, etc. has proven successful.

Those who object to loss of privacy, must sacrifice as we did in previous wars. Life is much more important.

Bill Brannon

Davidson

History shows that in times of war surveillance can be key

As the nation debates and discusses the balance of privacy versus security with the Guardian’s recent revelations of big data intelligence gathering by the NSA, it must be remembered that after WWI in 1929, the code breaking agency of the United States, called “The Black Chamber,” was disbanded.

President Hoover’s Secretary of State Henry L. Stimson refused to continue its funding with the now-famous comment, “Gentlemen do not read other people’s mail.”

WWII found the United States at a code breaking disadvantage.

Read “The Black Chamber” by Herbert O. Yardley.

Chase Saunders

Charlotte


In response to “Obstacle-course races’ fun comes with great danger,” (June 9):

Spectacles like mud runs reveal much about us; count me out

A culture obsessed with faux-toughness and supposedly epic fun presents us with a Manichaean choice: awesome running spectacles featuring mud, or merely lame, no-frills 12-milers.

The spectacle makes one suspect a “show-and-tell” mentality and herd behaviour. It’ll soon be passe entertainment like Demolition Derby or pro rasslin’.

Miles I can handle. If I require socializing, there’s always rowing crew. Purist? You betcha’.

Steve Craig

Charlotte

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

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