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The Observer Forum: Letters to the Editor

In response to “GOP tax bill passes Senate; Rucho protests” (June 14):

GOP tax plan will force cuts in education, hurt state’s economy

The N.C. legislature is poised to pass tax and budget legislation that will damage this state’s public investments, putting vital interests far behind needs for years to come.

This legislation will force major cuts to education, infrastructure and human services for the sake of tax cuts for the wealthy and corporations. It’s bad for this state’s economy and overall competitiveness.

What do the legislators plan to cut when the state has $1 billion less each year – teachers, universities, pre-K, elevator inspectors?

Our state cannot accept this assault on valued public investments.

Lucille Howard

Charlotte


In response to “City OKs budget and tax hike” (June 11):

Feels like City is playing games with tax hike, streetcar funding

So Charlotte’s new city manager can find millions of dollars lying around to fund a trolley, but now the City needs to raise everyone’s taxes? Seems to me this is just a round-about way of all of us paying for the trolley, even though no one wants it.

Typical government tricks.

Dick Meyer

Charlotte


Boycott I-77 toll lanes, it’ll make N.C. DOT do an about-face

To everyone complaining about proposed I-77 toll lanes: Give it up! It’s a done deal.

Big money donors to Rep. Thom Tillis and others in the N.C. legislature have decreed that the toll lanes be built.

However, there is a solution:

Boycott!

A private, for-profit company will manage the toll lanes, collecting money each time you use them. Simple logic dictates that low usage equals low revenue, equals no profit.

Private company loses money and bails out! N.C. DOT takes over for pennies on the dollar and converts toll lanes to general purpose lanes! Taxpayers win.

Hit them where it hurts – in the pocketbook.

Gary Lee

Lincolnton


Easy to get around in Seattle and not a trolley in sight

I just spent three days in Seattle where I traveled on a modern monorail, buses and light rail. I went from one side of the city to the cruise terminal for less than $15, getting on and off to visit Seattle sights.

We need to link Charlotte’s light rail to Lake Norman, the Speedway and airport. Do as Seattle has done – elevate it so as not to impede traffic.

Nowhere in Seattle did I find a streetcar! And yes, all the buses and light-rail cars were full of riders.

If we could get with the program, we would not need toll roads and we’d see traffic ease.

Grant Eagle

Concord


Look around, DNC is gone and roadside trash is piling up again

Having the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte proved one thing: When we need to clean trash and weeds from our curbs and medians we certainly find the money and manpower to do it.

Now that the glitz and glamour of the DNC are long gone, two-foot weeds and cigarette butts continue to build along our roadways as if no one cares.

This is one of those issues that continues to plague Charlotte year after year. We tend to be so worried about the next big thing, we forget about the basics of maintaining our city.

Ken Rutherford

Charlotte


In response to “Data mining is worrisome, but the alternative is worse” (June 13):

NSA leak offers chance for Congress to restore our trust

Most of us agree we must tolerate collection of whatever data is necessary for security. The central issue is who, other than the NSA, should have access to the data and how it should be protected.

Now that we’ve all been made aware of the NSA programs and their scope, Congress has the pressing opportunity to define proper access and impose severe penalties for improper access/use to preserve what little is left of our privacy – and give us a reason to trust our government.

James W. Plonk

Charlotte


In response to “Free breakfast approved for every CMS student” (June 11):

There’s nothing ‘free’ about that breakfast; not government’s job

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools has approved a plan for all students to get a “free” breakfast, citing evidence that kids do better in school if they have breakfast.

This makes perfect sense, to take the responsibility from parents to provide for their children. After all, our society continues to relinquish individual responsibility to the government.

But why stop with breakfast? Wouldn’t a “free” lunch be beneficial for afternoon classes? Many students have after-school activities. Wouldn’t a good supper be helpful in doing homework?

Oh, by the way, we’ll need to raise taxes for these “free” meals.

Rodger Parker

Huntersville


Richardson has some nerve donating for UNCC stadium

How can Jerry Richardson, in all good conscience, donate $10 million to UNC Charlotte for a football stadium – and take the tax write-off on the donation – when in effect he asked taxpayers to help pay for $300 million in upgrades to Bank of America Stadium?

I guess that is what is meant in Charlotte by “playing with the big leagues.” Obviously the ultra-rich play by different rules.

Jane J. Crutchfield

Charlotte

Richardson’s critics don’t get it, he has given this city so much

I have a hard time understanding the vitriol and acrimony towards Jerry Richardson.

He brought an NFL team to Charlotte, creating revenue and putting us on the national map.

Without him, I venture, there would be no bowl games, no national soccer events, no Democratic National Convention, no Charlotte Knights downtown, no 49ers football, to name a few.

Perhaps the way he went about gaining tax help could have been done in a better way. But other than ridicule and mean-spiritedness, what have those who are kicking him contributed?

Ross Levin

Charlotte

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

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