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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

In response to “S.C. to require CO alarms for many hotels” (June 18):

Require carbon monoxide alarms in more than hotels

For less than $50, a carbon monoxide detector would’ve prevented the death of Jeffrey Lee Williams.

Detectors should be part of every structure where people spend time indoors. N.C. Rep. Becky Carney is pushing for a law to require hotels to install them so no one else dies due to the lack of one.

The sooner, the better.

Lorraine Stark

Matthews


GOP legislature on the right path in revisiting old state laws

One good thing the Republican legislature and governor are doing, which most should be able to agree with, is revisiting laws which were written years ago. One might not agree with the results of the revisit, but the idea is sound.

To encourage this process to continue it would serve us well to have all laws written with a 25-year sunset clause, wherein all laws would automatically terminate if not voted on by the legislature to be continued.

Lewis Guignard

Crouse


In response to “N.C. Shame: Ignoring poverty” (June 17 Opinion) and “There’s nothing ‘free’ about that breakfast; not government’s job” (June 17 Forum):

Compassion heals poverty, but it seems to be in short supply

There seems to be a prevailing idea that many in our region are just “lazy” or “looking for a free ride.”

For those who believe it to be true, take a day from your secure suburban homes and stable jobs and talk to the people in the unemployment line or the families in line to get a bed at the shelter on a Tuesday night.

Stop by my job at Charlotte Community Health Clinic and talk to the hundreds who cannot afford health insurance in the wealthiest country in the world.

I continue to be amazed at the number who would rather point a finger than lend a hand.

Poverty is not a disease, it is a condition that is healed through love and compassion.

Martha M. Brinsko

Charlotte


In response to “Legislators put 75 mph limit on fast track” (June 18):

75 mph speed limit a mistake, speeders will just go faster

I cannot see one compelling reason to raise the N.C. speed limit to 75 mph, anywhere.

I drive the posted limit and am constantly passed by others going 10 to 15 mph faster, even on the few 70 mph stretches I drive.

If the limit in North Carolina is raised to 75, more people will be driving 80 since there is this 5 mph “cushion” before police pull you over for speeding.

This is just more useless legislation from our incredibly thoughtless legislators.

Lin Robinson

Shelby


Stop treating calls, texts in car like a life and death matter

As a military pilot, I flew in formations just a couple of feet from other planes, at 400 miles per hour or so, all while sending and receiving information over the radio. But we disciplined ourselves to limit our communications to mission-essential information.

Today’s drivers seem to act as though every communication is mission-essential. In reality, there is nothing, not a family death, not an abduction, not an illness, that is going to be positively affected by answering the phone right now in traffic.

The instant communications may satisfy some craving for being needed, but it’s almost never productive and probably never necessary in most of our lifetimes.

Tom Massey

Waxhaw

Greenway runners like me sick of inhaling cigarette smoke

I enjoy running on our beautiful greenway. Unfortunately every time I get near Carolinas Medical Center I begin to smell cigarette smoke.

When I run under the bridge at the main entrance to the hospital I have to run through a cloud of smoke.

Would it be too much to ask for smokers to stand by the dumpsters or in another area so the folks of Charlotte are not being blown on while we run?

Be considerate of those who enjoy exercising.

Laura Baughan

Charlotte


Tired of looking at mess road crews leave behind in Charlotte

It astounds me that a paving crew can get away with leaving such a mess after the recent repaving of Monroe Road.

Most of the wider medians are looking worse than before, covered in tar balls – not to mention the mounds of tar left along the curbs.

It has been this way now for weeks and it appears they got away with it again.

Doesn’t a Charlotte Department of Transportation supervisor check behind these guys and sign off on their work?

There may be more pressing issues in this city, but the unsightly mess left behind will be there for years to come and we’re the ones who have to look at it every day during commutes.

Mitch Simpson

Charlotte

Remove orange signs once road work is done; they’re a hazard

When will the city remove all the obsolete orange warning signs – lane closed, construction ahead, etc.?

There is an epidemic of them in the South Park, Providence Road and Wendover Road areas.

They are meaningless and have been up for months.

It’s confusing for drivers, and they are a blight on our landscape.

Abigail Schoff

Charlotte

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

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