Save Money in this Sunday's paper

comments

Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

Orr proved himself, City should have faith and follow his lead

For years it has been known that Jerry Orr is one of the best aviation directors in the country, perhaps the world. He built Charlotte-Douglas into a world-class airport, thus bringing businesses to Charlotte.

Why now is his opinion on the direction of the airport being questioned?

He wants what is best for the airport and the city. If he feels change is necessary to continue the growth and importance of the airport, then I trust that educated judgment. I hope the City will have that same faith in him.

Dottie Toney

Charlotte

Kudos to City for standing its ground on vital taxpayer asset

The issue of property rights is being disregarded.

The City purchased the land, built the buildings, negotiated the contracts with airlines, and employed the staff that has made the airport so successful.

It is unlikely that doubts about present or future management of Bank of America would trigger a similar response from Raleigh.

Why would the city’s property rights be any less valid?

I applaud the City for taking the necessary legal steps to protect this asset of the taxpayers.

Ward Simmons

Charlotte

City is getting a taste of its own medicine and I love it!

The N.C. legislature has approved an airport authority and is taking total control of the airport away from Charlotte.

The City is fighting, scratching, and screaming and has a temporary stay of execution.

In the end, we all know the City will lose.

All is not lost; they’ve learned a valuable lesson. They now know what annexation without owner approval is all about.

Roy Brown

Matthews

In response to Ruth Samuelson’s “Why we passed the airport bill” (July 18 Viewpoint):

Business leaders support CLT takeover? So who are they?

Assertions in this article indicate the Charlotte business community was the driving force behind this taking of Charlotte property. Those assertions leave me wondering who they are.

I’ve seen several hard-core, right-wing Republicans – Stan Campbell for one – but we have not seen an outpouring for support for this bill in the Charlotte business community.

The airport authority bill is just a shot at Charlotte for being primarily a Democratic-leaning city.

David Isaac

Concord


In response to “Tillis tries, but can’t serve two masters” (July 19 Editorial):

Obama could be slammed

for same reasons Tillis was

Once again, the Observer shows its true Democratic colors by slamming N.C. House Speaker Thom Tillis for taking time to seek donations for his upcoming U.S. Senate campaign.

I didn’t see any strong commentary concerning President Obama’s recent $100 million vacation; or his horrible voting history while in Congress; or comments when he was seeking contributions for his last presidential campaign and was often away from the White House during very difficult times.

James R. Wells

Lake Wylie, S.C.


It may not be fair but it’s fact; that hoodie send a message

A recent article about linebacker Jadeveon Clowney emphasized that he managed to “avoid trouble.”

Why would this be a primary point? Perhaps because, as the photo showed, he is black and has a braided hairstyle?

This seems to validate that impressions are indeed made by one’s appearance.

With regard to the Trayvon Martin tragedy: Yes, one has the “right” to wear a hoodie, but one should realize that a certain message is most likely to be inferred by the general public.

Is this right and just? No. It is simply so.

I recall an admired professor telling me, in my rebellious youth, “The way you look speaks so loudly I can’t hear what you say.”

D. Mark Perkins

Charlotte


To really save money eliminate UNC system athletic admissions

Thursday’s For the Record column, (“A way to save money and help community college students,” July 18 Opinion), targets the wrong students to deny admission to University of North Carolina system schools.

Eliminate “athletic” admissions. This would save N.C. taxpayers many millions and allow the UNC system to concentrate on its real mission: education and research.

Marcus Henry

Durham


In response to “Fighting changes to zoning may get harder” (July 16):

Public has few tools to fight zoning changes; don’t kill one

As multifamily real estate developers, our business stands to profit if neighbors are unable to file protest petitions.

But in Charlotte and other N.C. cities developers already hold most of the cards vs. neighborhoods, and this law would eliminate one of the few tools citizens have to influence development that directly impacts their quality of life.

We strongly believe municipalities should be allowed to craft their own rules to guide development as they see fit.

For these reasons we urge the Senate to remove this overreaching provision from this bill.

Jim Hock

James Funderburk

Charlotte

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

  Read more



Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

  Read more


Quick Job Search
Salary Databases
Your 2 Cents
Share your opinion with our Partners
Learn More