Save Money in this Sunday's paper

comments

Paleontologists unearth big find in Utah

By Melissa Pandika
Los Angeles Times
Contact Us

We value reader comments and suggestions. Contact John Bordsen, SciTech editor.

SciTech is independently reported and edited through the newsroom of The Charlotte Observer. The underwriter plays no role in the selection of the content. To learn more about underwriting opportunities, email Glenn Proctor or call 704-358-5407.

Paleontologists have discovered a strange dinosaur: a relative of Triceratops with a humongous honker.

Nasutoceratops titusi, whose genus name means “big-nose horned face,” roamed present-day Utah about 76 million years ago. The find sheds further light on the dinosaur communities that inhabited what is now the western part of North America.

Similar to its relative Triceratops, Nasutoceratops measured about 15 feet long and weighed roughly 2.5 tons. Its colossal 4.5-foot skull bore a single horn over the nose, a horn above each eye and an elongated, bony frill toward the rear. Its large, flat teeth were perfect for eating plant matter.

The dinosaur also possessed an array of unique features, according to a report published Wednesday in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

For one, the bony cavern housing Nasutoceratops’ nose was remarkably large compared with those of other horned dinosaurs. But that doesn’t necessarily mean the creature had a more refined sense of smell, because the olfactory receptors would have sat farther back in the skull, said Scott Sampson, a paleontologist at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science who co-wrote the study.

Unearthing a new species

Paleontologists unearthed the Nasutoceratops skull and other bone fragments at Utah’s Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in 2006 while on an excavation to understand how Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops communities had formed. The region was once part of Laramidia, an island formed when a shallow sea flooded central North America.

Study coauthor Eric Lund, a University of Utah graduate student at the time, spotted the bones protruding from the ground. For the next few weeks, he and the other team members worked on excavating the remains. After encasing the fossils in protective plaster, they hauled them onto a rescue board – the type used by paramedics – and took them to Salt Lake City, where they used miniature jackhammers to chip away the plaster and remaining sediment. That process took roughly three years.

To make sure they had found a new species, the team then spent three years traveling the world, comparing the fossils’ physical characteristics with those of all known plant-eating specimens, some housed as far away as Sweden and China. Their analysis revealed that the behemoth did indeed represent a new branch on the dinosaur family tree.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

  Read more



Quick Job Search
Salary Databases