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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

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  • Forum writers:

    We need your help. We suspect some letters sent to opinion@charlotteobserver.com are not getting through. If you’ve submitted letters in the past year that bounced back or you suspect did not reach us, please email nwebb@charlotteobserver.com.



In response to “Is the legislature helping K-12 education? Yes” (Aug. 11 Viewpoint):

What Sen. Berger left out in his defense of legislature and K-12

If Sen. Phil Berger learned anything in school, it was how to play with numbers.

“The overwhelming majority of our educators are top-notch,” he says, but only 25 percent will get that merit raise he brags about. And that $5,000 raise over four years comes out to $1,250 a year. That’s about $60 a paycheck. Hope you notice that, valued teacher. Oh, by the way, no more reward for getting a master’s degree. Hope you don’t notice that. And your class size is going up. Hope you don’t notice that either. Or that permanently absent teacher’s assistant.

And those 1,000 open teacher positions that Sen. Berger bragged about? If North Carolina is where the best teachers want to teach, there would be more applicants than positions, not 1,000 open spots two weeks before school starts.

Quality education is not cheap.

Hank Durkin

Charlotte


In response to “Critics confront Pittenger” (Aug. 10):

Defund Obamacare, Pittenger, or face a true conservative

I believed Robert Pittenger when he ran his campaign on conservative principles and values, but have been disappointed on his ability to vote to defund Obamacare. It’s very simple – if you’re against it, vote to defund it. His inability to do that will lead to another, more suitable candidate to take his place.

Conservatives need to quit pandering to Democrats who will never vote for them and instead focus on getting our country solvent and financially sound.

Trigg Cherry

Charlotte


In response to “What N.C.’s tax changes mean to you” (Aug. 11):

There’s more to high quality of life in N.C. than low taxes

How unfortunate that the conversation about the N.C. quality of life is reduced to a low tax rate based on a disproven assumption that that leads to more jobs. How about schools, quality teachers, clean water and other public investments vital to the quality of life for all?

We haven’t seen anything yet. Budget experts report that this tax deal leads to woefully inadequate revenues that leave a $600 million hole in the budget each year. Investments in the infrastructure that makes North Carolina a great place to live will be at historic lows.

The people have been short-changed.

Mary Klenz

Charlotte

Tax changes put money where it belongs: In citizens’ pockets

The most important take away from Sunday’s headline about N.C. tax changes is the fact that taxpayers will have two billion dollars more in their pockets to spend as they choose, not lost to bureaucratic agencies where waste is often the result.

The Republican legislators have done a real service to the citizens of this state.

Elton Shoemaker

Charlotte


McCrory right to stand his ground and sign voter ID bill

Way to stand your ground, Gov. McCrory, by signing that voter ID bill. The claim that it will deny people the right to vote is absolutely correct – it will deny non-citizens the right to vote, which is exactly as it should be. The claim that some citizens are too poor to get an ID is nonsense, and the supporters of that claim are either incredibly naïve or outright scam artists. Anyone can get an ID, and everyone needs one and should have one, voting rights aside.

Carl Martin

Concord


On reval, go with the language in the bill, not in Tarte’s mind

It sounds like the Mecklenburg revaluation bill was moved quickly through the legislature without a thorough vetting of the language. Sen. Jeff Tarte and Rep. Bill Brawley can interpret the law anyway they want, but the language clearly states “conduct a review of all the values” by neighborhood. If Tarte and Brawley had wanted a complete re-do they should have put that language in the law.

Gray Newman

Mint Hill


In response to “Family survives weeks lost at sea” (Aug. 12):

Next time, let’s let Hannah Gastonguay keep floating away

Hannah Gastonguay should have her children removed from her care and placed in the custody of people who actually care about them. Second, I trust that she will be billed for the total costs of her rescue. She seems to object to paying taxes, but doesn’t mind having the public absorb the costs of her rescue.

The next time she decides to try another such trip, instead of perhaps just buying a ticket, I hope we will just let her go (without her kids of course).

Richard Schmidt

Concord

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

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This affects comments on all stories.

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

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