August 2014

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    Sonny Smith, who along with his brother Arthur formed the popular country band Crackerjacks, which recorded the hit 1948 song “Guitar Boogie” and had a longrunning TV and radio show on WBTV in Charlotte during the 1950s and ‘60s.
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    Local fishing legend Richard Kale, John Campbell, and former The Charlotte Observer columnist Kays Gary after a lucrative and lucky day on the lake.
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    John’s Trading Post in Mooresville was one of the first stores to open at Lake Norman. It was a popular gathering place for folks to buy supplies, swap stories, and show off the day’s catch.
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    John P. Campbell moved his family to Lake Norman in the early 1960s. For years they nearly had the entire lake to themselves during the week and offseason.
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    John Campbell entertains a game warden in a back cove along Tuscarora Trail in Mooresville.
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    boaters enjoying the lake at the end of Brawley School Road Peninsula in Mooresville (now called Tuscarora Trail below The Point).
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    Grier Martin, former Davidson College president, proudly displays his catch at John’s Trading Post.
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    Donna Campbell (standing, to the left), ejoying a party on the lake with her 8th grade classmates from Ranson Junior High School.

50th Anniversary Special

By Sam Boykin | Photography by Donna and Cindy Campbell

Posted: Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013

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Charlottean John Campbell was one of the first pioneers who moved to Lake Norman. He bought a couple of lakefront lots on Brawley School Road in Mooresville as a weekend retreat in the early 1960s, and a few years relocated his family to the lake full time and opened John’s Trading Post. It was one of the only stores in the area, and soon became a popular gathering place.

“People stopped in to hear all the local news and buy gas and ice and anything and everything they would need for a weekend of fishing or skiing or camping,” remembers John’s daughter, Donna, who worked at the store growing up. “We also had the only telephone, and kept a box of keys to hundreds of cabins. When people caught fish they would bring them back to show and tell. And we had the only accurate scales anywhere around. John would post their photo on the bulletin board and also give them a picture to take home.”

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