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Polls: Most North Carolinians disapprove of Barack Obama and Pat McCrory

  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2013/09/16/14/11/DzGtW.Em.156.jpeg|250
    Pablo Martinez Monsivais - AP
    President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks in the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex, Monday, Sept. 16, 2013, in Washington. Before speaking about the economy Obama spoke on the shooting at the Washington Navy Yard, mourning what he called "yet another mass shooting" in the United States that he says took the life of American patriots.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2013/09/04/22/35/140-AlzWu.Em.156.jpeg|238
    Chris Seward - cseward@newsobserver.com
    Gov. Pat McCrory speaks at the State Board of Education meeting in Raleigh, NC on Sept. 4, 2013. He talked about why he vetoed a couple of bills that the Legislature overrode in the past two days.

President Barack Obama and Gov. Pat McCrory have one thing in common: Growing numbers of North Carolinians don’t like the way they’re doing their jobs.

Those are the findings of two polls released this week.

An Elon University poll of North Carolina voters released Thursday also showed seven in 10 say the state is headed in the wrong direction.

The overall results mirrored those of a survey of North Carolina adults by High Point University.

Both polls showed people believe the country is headed in the wrong direction.

“There’s a lot of pessimists out there and that’s going to spill over to a lot of people,” said Kenneth Fernandez, director of the Elon poll. “Nobody really came out smelling like roses in this survey.”

The Elon poll of 701 registered voters showed:

• Approval for Obama, a Democrat, fell to 38 percent. In April it was 45 percent.

• For McCrory, a Republican, approval fell to 36 percent from 46 percent.

• Fewer than 14 percent of voters approve of the job Congress is doing. That’s even lower than nationally. About 19 percent of Americans approve of Congress, according to an average of polls by Real Clear Politics.

• Approval for the N.C. General Assembly was at 32 percent, down three points since April.

Nationally, Obama has been dogged by the crisis in Syria. Congress has continued to be locked in partisan gridlock, with the threat of a government shutdown looming on Oct. 1.

In North Carolina, the Republican-controlled legislature passed – and McCrory signed – a series of controversial bills, including those involving abortion and voting.

The state’s unemployment rate rose to 8.9 percent in August, tied for third-worst in the country.

Almost half of those who said the state is on the wrong track blamed Republicans; 19 percent blamed Democrats and 27 percent said no single party deserved the blame.

Disapproval of Congress appeared to rub off on the state’s two U.S. senators.

The Elon poll found 38 percent of voters approved of the job Democrat Kay Hagan is doing while 37 percent approve of Republican Richard Burr’s performance.

Most voters, the poll showed, aren’t familiar with two of Hagan’s would-be Republican opponents next year.

The poll found fewer than one in three North Carolina voters recognized the name of either House Speaker Thom Tillis of Cornelius or Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger of Eden.

Morrill: 704-358-5059
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