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Bacon jam will have uses everywhere

By Nealey Dozier
Thekitchn.com
GIPMLTN6.5
- Nealey Dozier
Try bacon jam on a breakfast sandwich or grilled cheese.

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  • Sweet and Savory Bacon Jam

    1 pound thick-cut bacon, cut into 3/4-inch pieces

    2 small sweet onions, peeled and thinly sliced

    1 large shallot (2 cloves), peeled and very thinly sliced

    1/2 cup pure maple syrup

    1/4 cup balsamic vinegar

    2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

    2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce

    Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

    SET a large Dutch oven or heavy skillet over medium-high to high heat. Add the bacon and cook, stirring occasionally, until it begins to brown and crisp, 15 to 20 minutes. Keep all the bacon fat in the pan; do not discard (see note).

    LOWER the heat to medium. Stir in the onions and shallots, and cook until softened, 8 to 10 minutes. Add the maple syrup, vinegar, Dijon and Worcestershire sauce. Season with salt and pepper. Pour in 1/2 cup water and stir to combine. Bring the mixture to a boil, reduce heat to low and simmer, stirring occasionally if necessary. Cook until the jam has a glossy appearance and syrup-like consistency, about 1 hour.

    ALLOW the mixture to cool for 20 to 30 minutes. Transfer to a blender and pulse a few times to puree the larger pieces, stopping every pulse or two to stir and check the consistency. It should be thick and chunky, not a paste.

    TRANSFER to an airtight container. Bacon jam can be refrigerated for up to one month. Serve at room temperature.

    NOTE: Some recipes call for discarding some of the bacon fat before adding the onions. I kept all of the fat but it is personal preference. If you are going to make bacon jam, you might as well go all in!

    YIELD: 1 1/2 to 2 cups (can be doubled or tripled).



As a Southerner, I know I’m supposed to pledge a certain allegiance to bacon, but I have to admit the “bacon-makes-everything-better” trend had me rolling my eyes after the first month or so. (And that was five years ago!)

Then I made this sweet and savory bacon jam, and I’ll be darned if I didn’t want to slather it on everything from breakfast sandwiches to cupcakes.

You might have heard of bacon jam from “Top Chef” winner Kevin Gillespie of Atlanta, who helped put high-end Southern fare on the culinary map. Or perhaps you heard of bacon jam from the now-famous Skillet Street Food, a food truck-turned-restaurant chain in Seattle. Skillet’s version of braised porky goodness has a major cult following and is now sold on grocery shelves coast to coast. No matter how (or where) you look at it, pig is still in.

If you haven’t already discovered bacon jam for yourself, here’s your chance. There are a lot of variations floating around the Internet, including ones using coffee, brown sugar, garlic, bourbon and peppers. My version gets its inspiration from a recipe for glazed bacon, with its addictive combination of sugar, tangy Dijon and Worcestershire sauce.

I used those same ingredients, adding balsamic vinegar, onions and shallots to the mix. My jam came together fairly quickly and is relatively hands off. Once you fry the bacon and saute the onions, everything else gets thrown in the pot and simmered until all the ingredients cook down. (Warning: It will take everything in your power not to jump right on in.)

There are a million ways to serve bacon jam, and half the fun is seeing how crazy you can get. My personal favorite (besides eating it straight from a spoon) is to build the ultimate breakfast sandwich. Try it – toasted challah, cheddar, oven-roasted tomatoes, field greens, a fried egg and a heap of bacon jam – and don’t tell me it isn’t the best breakfast sandwich you’ve ever had.

Seriously, the possibilities are endless. Spread it in between a grilled cheese, slap it on a burger, or drip it over hot biscuits. And, hey, don’t be afraid to ice it on a cupcake. Just sayin’.

Nealey Dozier is a writer for TheKitchn.com, a website on food and home cooking.

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