Save Money in this Sunday's paper

comments

Oreos affect rats like cocaine, study finds

By Kathleen Megan
Hartford Courant
Contact Us

We value reader comments and suggestions. Contact John Bordsen, SciTech editor.

SciTech is independently reported and edited through the newsroom of The Charlotte Observer. The underwriter plays no role in the selection of the content.

HARTFORD, Conn. Oreos may be as addictive as cocaine – to lab rats, anyway.

That’s according to new research from Connecticut College that compared rats’ reactions to the sandwich cookies and to drugs.

In a study designed to consider the potential addictiveness of foods with high fat and sugar content, Connecticut College Professor Joseph Schroeder and his students found eating the cookies activated more neurons in the brain’s “pleasure center” than exposure to cocaine or morphine.

They also found that the association rats formed between Oreos and a feeding chamber were as strong as associations to places where drugs were dispensed.

“Our research supports the theory that high-fat, high-sugar foods stimulate the brain in the same way that drugs do,” Schroeder said. “It may explain why some people can’t resist these foods despite the fact that they know they are bad for them.”

Schroeder, an assistant professor of neuroscience, will present the research next month at the Society for Neuroscience conference in San Diego, Calif.

The research was the inspiration of neuroscience major Jamie Honohan, who undertook a project through the college’s Holleran Center for Community Action and Public Policy.

The study was conducted by setting up two adjoining chambers for the rats. In one experiment, rats were given Oreo cookies in one space and rice cakes in the other. It was clear, Honohan said, that the rats preferred the Oreos, splitting the cookies apart and devouring the cream first and then going on to eat the cookies. While they often didn’t bother to finish the rice cakes, that wasn’t the case with the Oreos.

“Just like humans, rats don’t seem to get much pleasure out of eating (rice cakes),” Schroeder said.

Then, the food was removed and the rats were given the option of spending time in either chamber. The rats spent far more time in the chamber where the Oreos had been than in the chamber where the rice cakes had been.

In a second experiment, rats were given a shot of cocaine or morphine in one chamber, while they received a shot of saline in the other. Again, the substances were removed and the rats were given the choice of which chamber to spend time in.

The research showed that the cookie-conditioned rats chose to spend as many hours in the Oreos chamber as the drug-conditioned rats spent in the chambers where drugs had been injected.

In a second part of the research, Schroeder and his students measured the increased neuron activity in the part of the brain that registers pleasure – and the cookies activated significantly more neurons than the drugs.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

  Read more



Quick Job Search
Salary Databases
CharlotteObserver.com