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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

In response to”Jerry Orr’s quiet war for the airport” (Oct. 27):

Orr was wrong on a lot but

he’s still good at one thing

Jerry Orr made three mistakes in his handling of the airport control issue. He terminated his employment with the city of Charlotte with a ham-handed letter that burned his bridge to the city government. He hired Richard Vinroot, who not only let him send such a letter but was so clueless that he was blind-sided by the lawsuit the city filed the same day. And Orr hitched his wagon to Bob Rucho, Thom Tillis and other “small government” hypocrites bent on wresting control from N.C.cities and concentrating it in Raleigh.

Jerry Orr is good at one thing. He knows how to run the Charlotte airport. Let’s hope that those in charge, either the city or the new airport commission, find a way to use that talent, and that Mr. Orr can focus his efforts where they’ll do the most good.

Terry Neal

Mooresville


In response to “Why Edwin Peacock is the best choice for mayor” (Oct. 27):

Cannon is far superior candidate for Charlotte mayor

The Observer's tepid endorsement of Edwin Peacock -- he's not a homophobe and he'll be outnumbered by Democrats anyway -- embarrassingly recalls its gubernatorial endorsement a year ago of Pat McCrory, another so-called “moderate Republican who could work successfully with Democrats.” Like McCrory, Peacock will have no reason to challenge his party's extremist base once elected.

More significantly, the endorsement ignores the experience and vision of Patrick Cannon. His commitment to Charlotte's economic growth, neighborhood revitalization and public safety, evinced by his City Council service, make him the vastly superior candidate.

Charles Johnson

Charlotte

Vote for Peacock for mayor; he has no agenda but to serve

Edwin Peacock is a native Charlottean who cares deeply about our city. He is an experienced office holder who respects our past and has a vision of our future. He has no personal agenda except to serve. He is a successful businessman who would be a responsible steward of our fiscal resources.

Jim Beatty

Charlotte


In response to “Tackling racial inequality in juvenile justice system” (Oct. 27 For the Record):

Black community must own problem of black violent crime

Judge Trosch makes a common mistake at the beginning of his commentary. He describes a situation, rather than identifying the problem. He then proceeds, in the style of a true liberal, to excuse and make victims of those involved and finally promotes a task force to investigate and remedy the situation. The problem is that roughly two-thirds of all violent crime in our community is by blacks. Until the black community accepts ownership of this problem, no amount of liberal clap-trap will be helpful.

Don Reid

Charlotte


In response to “Calvary cuts ties with boy scouts” (Oct. 27):

Scouts are welcome at St. Mark’s; we embrace all

The writer is senior pastor of St. Mark’s Lutheran Church in Charlotte:

I am always a bit disturbed by “Christian” churches that claim to be authentic followers of Jesus and then turn people away for whatever reason. Jesus turned no one away. After reading about a local congregation’s dismissal of a Boy Scout troop the Scripture that comes to mind is John 11:35, “And Jesus wept.”

Let it be known that any Cub Scout or Boy Scout troop that has been dismissed from a church is welcome at St. Mark's Lutheran Church, Charlotte. Not only will you be welcome, but you will be embraced. Call us.

Peter Brown

Charlotte


In response to “Glitches inevitable, but the end product will be worth the wait” (Oct. 28 Forum):

Kennedy had timetable and met it; we’ll see about Obama

Lorraine Stark excuses glitches in the Affordable Care Act sign up saying NASA didn’t get to the moon immediately. True, but then president John F. Kennedy set a timetable for the successful landing, which was indeed met. It will be interesting to see how the current president’s plan works out.

Henry N. Graham

Charlotte


In response to “Under mountain of debt, Obamacare makes little sense” (Oct. 27 Forum):

Rich have gotten richer, while income for rest has stagnated

Tony Capranica is concerned that the Affordable Care Act is a “redistribution of wealth.” I'm not sure if he has been paying attention. The rich have gotten substantially richer while the rest of us have stagnated. If Americans are to pay for their healthcare they need decent-paying jobs. This will not happen until our government invests in such things as education, infrastructure and research. Continuing to cut taxes for the most wealthy is not good for healthcare or the deficit.

Laura Reich

Matthews

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This affects comments on all stories.

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

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