Kannapolis breaks ground for municipal center and police headquarters
comments
Saturday, Nov. 02, 2013

Kannapolis breaks ground for municipal center and police headquarters

  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2013/10/31/10/52/fHtXx.Em.138.jpeg|473
    MARTY PRICE - MARTY PRICE
    Kannapolis Mayor Robert Misenheimer speaks to the crowd during the City Council’s groundbreaking ceremony for the new 100,000-square-foot municipal center and police headquarters building on the North Carolina Research Campus.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2013/10/31/10/52/hxu2T.Em.138.jpeg|210
    MARTY PRICE - MARTY PRICE
    Kannapolis Mayor Robert Misenheimer, left, starts dropping dirt with Kannapolis city officials, including Police Chief James W. “Woody” Chavis, third from right, during the City Council’s groundbreaking ceremony for the new 100,000-square-foot municipal center and police headquarters building on the North Carolina Research Campus.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2013/10/31/10/52/9QUFI.Em.138.jpeg|210
    MARTY PRICE - MARTY PRICE
    Architect David Creech, left, managing principal with Creech and Associates, shakes hands with Kannapolis Police Chief James W. “Woody” Chavis before the Kannapolis City Council broke ground on its new municipal center and police headquarters.

The Kannapolis City Council broke ground Oct. 29 on a 100,000-square-foot municipal center and police headquarters.

The building will be at 401 Laureate Way on 6.6 acres donated by North Carolina Research Campus founder David Murdock.

The site faces the David H. Murdock Core Laboratory Building on the campus.

The municipal building will house administrative offices for all city departments, police headquarters, City Council chambers and a centralized customer service center.

Included in the design is unfinished space for short-term economic development activities and long-term future expansion of the city’s administrative services.

The design also includes 5,500 square feet of public meeting and conference space, both incorporated into the facility to stimulate economic growth in downtown Kannapolis.

The project is anticipated to be completed in September 2015.

In an email, City Manager Mike Legg said the projected cost for the new building is $28.1 million. Of that, $20.9 million will be for actual construction. About $2.4 million will pay for design, permits and construction administration.

The rest, $4.7 million, is set aside for construction contingencies, furniture, fixtures, equipment, audio-visual and technology enhancements as well as offsite improvements.

The building will replace 25,000 square feet that the city leases in six buildings to house police operations and city administration. The $230,000 in annual lease payments alone adds up to $3 million of borrowing capacity, Legg wrote.

About $5.5 million in Tax Increment Financing bonds will be used to construct the facility. The bonds are being repaid by taxes from the North Carolina Research Campus and other downtown investments. That money will be used primarily for the construction of the meeting space.

In tax increment financing, tax revenue exclusively from new development in a specified zone is used to pay back the bonds.

Legg also wrote that the rest of the cost will be paid by the proceeds of limited obligation bonds to be sold early next year.

The project team includes architects Creech & Associates and Rodgers Builders Inc. as construction manager at risk.

For project details, visit the city’s website or call the Kannapolis city offices at 704-920-4300. Freelance writer Marty Price contributed to this story.

Marusak: 704-987-3670; Twitter: @jmarusak

The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

  Read more