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Dog adoption day at the executive mansion in Raleigh on Saturday

Ann McCrory_03
DAVIE HINSHAW - THE CHARLOTTE OBSERVER
North Carolina first lady Ann McCrory holds Zipper, a 2-month-old shepherd mix, at the Humane Society of Charlotte on Thursday. Zipper will be among the dogs up for adoption during an event at the executive mansion in Raleigh from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday. The Humane Society of Charlotte and two other animal rescue groups will provide as many as 30 dogs for adoption. Kids are welcome to sit down for storytelling or dog face painting as well.

North Carolina first lady Ann McCrory on Thursday held Zipper, a 2-month-old shepherd mix, at the Humane Society of Charlotte.

Zipper will be among the dogs up for adoption during an event at the executive mansion in Raleigh from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday.

The Humane Society of Charlotte and two other animal rescue groups will provide as many as 30 dogs for adoption. Kids are welcome to sit down for storytelling or dog face painting as well.

Gov. Pat McCrory wants the public to adopt abandoned and maltreated dogs while he and his wife keep seeking legislation to set minimum care standards at large commercial dog breeding operations.

McCrory held a news conference Wednesday to advertise Saturday’s dog adoption day at the executive mansion. Joining him outside the old Capitol building were a few dogs removed from a Pender County location last month.

The governor said some of the Pender County dogs will be among as many as 30 pets on the mansion property looking for new owners this weekend.

The governor and Ann McCrory promoted a bill this year that sets minimum care standards for some people who breed dogs to sell as pets. The measure passed the House but didn’t get heard in the Senate. The General Assembly reconvenes in May. The House bill, which would apply to some operations with at least 10 female dogs, sets specific standards to ensure that dogs have daily exercise, fresh food and water, shelter and veterinary care.

“I’m not going to give up on the bill,” the governor said. “This dog issue is not a Democratic or Republican issue – it’s an independent issue for every one of us.”

The McCrorys own one dog named Moe, whom the Republican governor said was a rescue animal. Moe lives at the couple’s Charlotte residence. Holding one of the Pender County dogs in his arms after the news conference, the governor said another pet could be in the cards for the McCrory family.

“I’m afraid we'll have a new dog by Saturday,” the governor quipped. Associated Press

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