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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

In response to “McCrory wants N.C. out front for drilling” (Dec. 5):

Accidents happen; oil isn’t worth the risk on N.C. coast

When Japan’s nuclear reactor failed and polluted the Pacific Ocean, I quit buying seafood that came from anywhere near there. The same with seafood from the Gulf after the oil drill failure.

Accidents happen. It’s only a matter of when.

If drilling is allowed in the Atlantic, it will only be a matter of time before an accident occurs. The question is, does oil/gas production mean more than ocean seafood production for human sustainability?

I don’t know about you, but I’d rather have non-contaminated seafood than run the risks of oil rigs contaminating our food supply and pristine coastline.

Kris Solow

Charlotte

Use coast for clean wind energy, not dirty oil exploration

As a grad student at UNC Chapel Hill, I excitedly learned about several professors’ offshore wind energy work. They were helping determine how to effectively harvest the “Saudi Arabia” of offshore wind.

So where’s the wind farm? Now, the same coastline that could be used for clean, renewable energy may be used for dirty oil drilling, preceded by dangerous seismic airgun testing.

It seems a bit like worrying about your next paycheck while blowing your nose with $20 bills.

Gov. McCrory, you’re in the driver’s seat now... Are we in forward or reverse?

Lindsay D’Ambrosio

Washington, D.C.


In response to “College sports spending on the rise” (Dec. 5):

Quest for TV revenues spun college athletics out of control

Major college sports have been out of control for years. Meanwhile, the catalyst for the entire U.S. college system is television.

The current dynamic works in such a way that taxpayers are bankrolling athletic plants that are being used by TV companies to rake in billions of dollars.

Don’t believe me? Take a look at the number of college sports on TV on a Saturday. That is what is corrupting our university system.

Morgan Smith

Huntersville

Independent investigation needed for UNC to move on

It is possible to answer all the questions Peter St. Onge posed in “Still in the dark at UNC” (Dec. 4 O-pinion, the editorial board’s blog).

The UNC Board of Governors could order a thorough, independent investigation of the athletic department at UNC Chapel Hill. Only then can UNC officials move on from the scandal that is approaching its fourth year.

Of course it’s also possible that Board members do not want to take this action for fear of losing their court-side seats at the Dean Dome.

Matt Sharpe

Mint Hill


CMS school board should be held up as national model

The writer is a former school superintendent in N.C. and S.C.

It is refreshing to finally locate a seemingly unified and highly focused N.C. school board.

The current Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools board just might become a national model of how to appropriately conduct the public’s education business.

First, they hire a visionary superintendent. Then, they allow him to run the day-to-day operations without continually micro-managing him as he goes about discharging his administrative duties.

Of equal importance, they seem to focus primarily on effectiveness in teaching and learning, and not on fostering narrowly focused political agendas and personal “ax grinding.”

Wow, that behavior is both refreshing and unusual. Other school boards across the state just might do well to cast their eyes toward Mecklenburg County as they seek transformational educational improvement.

Ray Brayboy

Laurinburg


Carpool, toll lanes on I-485 and I-77 may not be best solution

The primary purpose of “managed lanes” is to provide access for commuters willing to pay a toll or possibly carpool.

A secondary benefit is that it will, or may, reduce congestion on the general purpose lanes. How much traffic is reduced depends on the number of commuters willing to pay for access.

The southeast section of I-485 and northern section of I-77 are reaching capacity. The question is, to what extent will traffic issues on these interstates be alleviated by “managed lanes”?

In public/private projects, shouldn’t all commuters be served?

Alan Johnson

Mooresville


In response to “A dramatic boost to Social Security?” (Dec. 6 Viewpoint):

Krugman may be smart, but his take on 401(k)s is off base

I used to think Paul Krugman was smart, but wrong with his liberal opinions. But I think his opinion on IRA/401(k)s is dumb.

He called them a “gigantic failure.” Maybe dummies like him didn’t take advantage of the opportunity they provide to grow wealth in a tax-free environment.

I did contribute, and with a matching amount from my company I managed to save and grow the investments to a healthy sum that will allow me to live comfortably in retirement.

Wake up Paul, just because the government let me invest for retirement doesn’t make it bad!

Peter Augusta

Charlotte

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

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