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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

In response to “Charlotte among 100 cities slated for fast-food strikes” (Dec. 4) and related articles:

Many stuck with fast-food jobs are paying for poor choices

A fast-food job is a low-skill, entry-level position. Pay is commensurate with the skill level.

These jobs were designed to give those new to the job market, skills, experience and a work ethic that could be transferred into a progressively better career.

They were never designed to compensate those who wasted their youth by missing school, getting high and getting pregnant in their teens by giving them a high-paying lifetime career.

Low pay for low skill is a consequence of these workers’ wasted opportunities.

Michael Grzonka

Gastonia


Siers missed the mark with Obama/economy cartoon

We are fortunate to have Kevin Siers’ wit in this community. His barbs are mostly right on, deflating biased myths, and puncturing inflated egos.

His latest target has been President Obama, and the Affordable Care Act roll-out gaffes have deserved that attention.

But I am at a loss to understand Siers’ Dec. 6 “It’s been rough so far...” cartoon.

The economy? How can you fault the man for the current economy?

Does anyone remember December 2008? I think Kevin may have had a lapse of memory.

Richard W. Barnes

Lake Wylie, S.C.


In response to “McCrory wants N.C. out front for drilling” (Dec. 5):

Drilling will hurt fishing industry on East Coast

Not only does Gov. Pat McCrory’s crazed idea about energy put N.C. wildlife in danger, it threatens the entire fishing economy of the East Coast.

In Norway, during the time span of seismic testing – or as the Norwegian fishermen call it, “seismic shootings” – the cod and haddock fisheries suffered immense losses for which they sought compensation.

Gov. McCrory is completely out of touch with what seismic testing is and the devastation it causes to coastal communities.

I invite Mr. McCrory to come to Wilmington to tell the coastal people that our livelihoods and our marine life are worth throwing away for the possibility of finding oil and gas.

Brady Bradshaw

Wilmington


In response to “Obama takes aim at income inequality” (Dec. 5):

Obama would be wise to take note of this famous slogan

I’ve got a nifty slogan for President Obama: “From each according to his ability, to each according to his needs.”

J. Paige Straley

Hickory


In response to “Walmart’s business plan: exploitative or good” (Dec. 2 Viewpoint) and related articles:

Let those who pay poverty wages chip in more to help

How about sending all companies, Walmart included, a bill for their portion of the public assistance programs that underpaid individuals must use in order to make ends meet?

Why should the taxpayers subsidize the incomes of purposely underpaid employees? Especially when those at the top of the food chain are making so much through the efforts of their own underpaid employees!

Gerry Randolph

Rock Hill


In response to “Couple faces charges in shooting of 3-year-old” (Nov. 29):

Call these tragic shootings what they are: negligence

The term “accidental shooting,” used in this article, perpetuates the idea that guns kill people, instead of people taking responsibility for killing people.

Competent shooters are trained in the safe handling and storage of firearms. It is irresponsible to report shootings like this as an accident when in fact, there is always negligence involved.

Cathi Higgins

Indian Trail


In response to “Anson inmates on lockdown” (Nov. 29):

Put inmates to work on roads; they get too many privileges

Why do we ever allow prisoners outside their cells? If they are dangerous enough to keep behind wire, they should be on permanent lockdown.

If not, they should be out on the roads, etc., working for the public good, chained together if necessary to prevent escape.

If they don’t like this treatment they can stop volunteering for internment, which is what they do each and every time they commit a crime.

Jerry Adcock

Monroe


There’s no justification for

our love of blood sports

During the Roman Empire armed gladiators entertained audiences in violent confrontations with other gladiators and even wild animals.

A modern equivalent is boxing where a man or woman attempts to render an opponent unconscious with severe blows to the head. Another is football, where the problems of concussion are coming to light.

Children as young as elementary school are playing football and risking what could become a lifetime disability.

It’s said that one third of college players sustain an injury which they carry through life. The violence of professional football has caused many former players to suffer early dementia and premature death.

And some NASCAR fans go to races hoping to see crashes.

How can we justify being entertained with blood sports?

Watson Burts

Charlotte

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This affects comments on all stories.

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

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