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Washington governor wants union vote on Boeing

By Mike Baker
Associated Press

More Information

  • Boeing expands North Charleston presence
  • Mecklenburg officials to meet in closed session

    Mecklenburg County officials will meet in closed session Tuesday to discuss an economic development issue, a week after the Charlotte City Council met in private to discuss a bid for a proposed Boeing factory.

    The Mecklenburg County commissioners’ economic development committee will convene at 4 p.m. Tuesday to discuss “a significant business relocation project,” according to a meeting notice on Friday.

    A county spokesman said he could not provide details on the meeting. John Allen, the county’s economic development director, could not be reached for comment.

    The city of Charlotte planned to give Boeing details about a site near Charlotte Douglas International Airport that could be used for a 777X jetliner plant that is the focus of a multistate bidding competition, sources told the Observer this week.

    Rick Rothacker and David Perlmutt



SEATTLE Washington Gov. Jay Inslee on Friday called for a vote on a proposed contract between Boeing and Puget Sound machinists, even though local union leaders have already rejected the company’s latest offer in the high-stakes negotiations to keep thousands of jobs in the state.

The contract would secure work on Boeing’s new 777X airplane at a time when 22 states, including both Carolinas, are competing for those jobs. Inslee said in a statement that union membership gives each worker a say in his or her future and they should have the opportunity to exercise that right.

“That should happen soon, as I have become increasingly concerned that we are at a perilous point in our effort to bring the 777X to Washington state,” said Inslee, who was endorsed by the local machinists union in his campaign for governor last year.

Leaders in the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers publicly differed Friday on whether to bring Boeing’s latest contract offer to a vote, exposing tensions within the union over how to handle the negotiations.

National union spokesman Frank Larkin said Friday that officials were exploring the idea of a vote after hundreds of members demanded an opportunity to have a say on the contract to secure work on the 777X. Larkin said members have always had the final say and they have every right to vote on the terms of the offer.

But local union officials said Friday they don’t see any point in bringing it to a vote because it’s too similar to a contract the union rejected a month ago by a 2-to-1 margin.

“So, until Boeing changes its conditions, we don’t have an offer to vote on,” District 751 President Tom Wroblewski said in a statement.

Looming over the talks is the prospect that the company could build the airplane elsewhere. Chicago-based Boeing said it has received proposals from 22 states eager for the 777X jobs, with some proposing multiple sites. The company said 54 sites are now being evaluated. Charlotte is among the cities and states vying for the plant and as many as 8,000 jobs that would come with it.

In its own bid to win the 777X jobs, Washington state recently approved tax breaks for Boeing valued at $9 billion over the coming years, along with legislation to improve aerospace training programs and the permitting process.

The latest round of contract talks collapsed Thursday after local machinists officials said they could not recommend Boeing’s latest proposal to members. Local union spokesman Bryan Corliss said Boeing has withdrawn the contract offer.

Boeing Co. spokesman Doug Alder said, however, that the offer was rejected by the union, not withdrawn. He declined to comment further on Friday.

Local union officials have seemed to disagree with their national leaders in recent weeks on how to handle Boeing’s offers. That division was clear last month, when local members voted to reject a contract negotiated by machinists leadership.

Boeing made changes this week to its original contract offer, backing away from a proposal that would slow the rate at which employees rise up the pay scale and adding an additional $5,000 in bonus pay. The biggest sticking point appears to be the company’s insistence that workers move from a traditional defined-benefit pension to a defined-contribution savings plan.

The local machinists said the company’s latest proposal was too high a price to pay to secure the 777X.

Boeing began offering the 777X in May, but it’s still finalizing plans for the plane and aiming to deliver the first aircraft by the end of the decade.

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