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New state laws coming for 2014

New state laws for 2014

Nearly two dozen new state laws take effect at the start of 2014, including many provisions of the 2013 tax legislation approved by the N.C. General Assembly. Other new laws that take effect Wednesday provide that:

• Jurors who serve a full term on a grand jury don’t have to serve again as a grand juror or juror for six years.

• Owners of plug-in electric vehicles must pay a $100 registration fee in addition to any other fees.

• Health care facilities that perform mammography exams must report breast density information to patients. Dense breast tissue may make it more difficult to detect abnormalities and increase the risk of cancer.

• Emergency workers can break into a car if they believe an animal inside is suffering or in danger. The same law also includes provisions intended to help pet owners find lost pets and relieve overcrowding and facilitate adoptions at animal shelters.

• Fees for many hunting and fishing licenses issued by the Wildlife Resources Commission will increase for residents and nonresidents. An annual sportsman/coastal recreational fishing license, for example, increases from $55 to $65. The same bill also creates a $10 bear management stamp that must be purchased before taking a bear. Revenue will go toward black bear research and management. The (Raleigh) News & Observer

N.C. involvement in gun case

There is a mounting political effort to come to the aid of a retired policeman in Virginia who was convicted of being a straw gun-buyer when he sold a 9mm handgun he had bought from a licensed dealer to his uncle in Pennsylvania.

He said he was just getting a law-enforcement discount for his uncle, but the federal government said that it was illegal and indicted him. The ex-officer, Bruce Abramski, appealed his conviction and the U.S. Supreme Court in October said it would take up the case.

Richard Dietz, an attorney with Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton in Winston-Salem, is one of Abramski’s attorneys.

Twenty-six state attorneys general have filed a “friend of the court” brief in support of the ex-officer. Grass Roots North Carolina, a gun-rights group, and the state Republican Party have begun publicly pressuring N.C. Attorney General Roy Cooper because he has not joined the case. The (Raleigh) News & Observer

McCrory makes appointments

Gov. Pat McCrory closed out the year with a flurry of recent appointments, a list that includes several people from the Charlotte region:

To the N.C. Parks and Recreation Authority: Jason Kay, senior assistant attorney for the city of Charlotte, appointed chairman. William Lewis, who is the N.C. Parks and Recreation Association president and was parks director for New Hanover County; and Ann Babcock, a retired real estate agent in Buncombe County, who is certified in “green building” consulting.

To the N.C. Youth Advisory Council: Daniel Freeman, Mecklenburg; Olga Perkins, Guilford; Don Byrd, Johnston; Susan Mills, Cumberland; Marsh Lyall, Wilkes; Carmen Ledford, Lee; Michael Woods, Buncombe; David Leonetti, Catawba; Richard Parks, Nash; Emmanuel Holder Sr., Wake.

To the N.C. Inmate Grievance Resolution Board: Wesley Barkley, Catawba.

To the Roanoke Island Commission: Justin Tillett, a Dare County insurance agent; Beth Twyne, a Realtor from Dare County; and James Davis, a retired Marine colonel who coordinates the Roanoke Island food pantry.

To the N.C. Education and Workforce Innovation Commission: Billie Redmond, CEO of a property management firm based in Raleigh; and Rod Webb, senior vice president of a bank in Raleigh.

To the N.C. Geographic Information Coordinating Council: Joseph Sloop, Forsyth.

To the N.C. Board of Landscape Architects: John Ross, Henderson.

To the N.C. State Historical Records Advisory Board: Scott Lancaster, New Hanover.

To the Governor’s Crime Commission: Gale Wilkins, Wake. The (Raleigh) News & Observer

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