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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

In response to Fannie Flono “Lawmakers, listen to those on front lines” (Jan. 10 Opinion):

Education in N.C. won’t improve under this GOP-led legislature

The problem is not so much that recent survey results show so many who think our state is going in the wrong direction with public education. The problem is I don’t believe the majority of the Republican-run General Assembly care.

Their ideology does not support public education. That’s why they are doing everything in their power to undermine it.

With no unions in our state, the teachers are at the mercy of the legislature. Until we change the make up of the General Assembly, education in North Carolina is unlikely to change.

Laura Reich

Matthews


Use tax dollars to reinvigorate apprenticeship system

It would make sense if government, educators and industry would collaborate to use tax dollars to fund apprenticeship programs.

Employers would insist on strict performance, teach specific skills and teach classes on site in English. They would teach basic science and arithmetic – yes, arithmetic not math.

Employers would be able to groom future employees with specific skill sets. Students would be able to prepare themselves for an honorable career – and earn a stipend for their efforts.

Look at successes from the past, such as Westinghouse Corp. and the ongoing apprenticeship programs now in effect at its successor, Siemens.

Tom Charping

Indian Trail


Sure glad my kids, grandkids were not educated in N.C.

Having grown up in states ranked in the top 10 in education, I was doubly fortunate while chasing a career to relocate to states where my children could be educated in high-ranking public school systems.

As globalization and technology created a faster, more competitive world, we relocated again and easily found highly ranked Northern school districts. Along the way, we heard folklore of poor Southern schooling and blamed short-sighted politicians.

Now retired in North Carolina, we see that the folklore is fact and we’re thankful that our Northern grandchildren will not have to endure an N.C. learning environment that politicians have driven to the bottom 5 percent in the U.S. in key indicators.

David Piendel

Charlotte


Christie, McCrory must have missed lesson on subordinates

Governors Chris Christie and Pat McCrory obviously don’t know one of the first rules of leadership: your subordinates are only a reflection of you.

Even the most junior Sergeant in the Army knows that, but apparently they don’t teach it to GOP governors.

Jack Flynn

Charlotte


In response to “Dangerous cold, record lows blanket large parts of U.S.” (Jan. 7) and related articles:

Solar power helped keep N.C. warm during polar freeze

The writer is a project developer with O2energies, Inc.

On Jan. 7 temperatures hit historic lows, creating a record high demand for electricity across the N.C. electric grid.

The N.C. solar fleet generated more electricity that day than 56,000 average homes consume. That is huge considering the alternative to supply that same amount of electricity may have otherwise come from diesel generators or natural gas; the fuel price of both spiked last week.

N.C. utilities buy solar at low long-term fixed rates which means solar not only helped provide grid reliability, but also helped utilities hedge the price spikes of oil and gas during those cold days.

Meanwhile South Carolina, which has very few solar installations, experienced rolling blackouts as utilities struggled to meet record high demand with existing generators.

Logan Stephens

Huntersville


In response to “Don’t count me among those Roe v. Wade supporters” (Jan. 9 Forum):

Can’t pin blame for unwanted pregnancies solely on women

Forum writer Ann Marie Lloyd makes it sound as though only women are responsible for the sexual decisions that might lead to unwanted/unplanned pregnancies.

What about men’s responsibility? Fine, get rid of abortion rights, increase paternity lawsuits and sue the fathers for support.

Camilla Polk

Charlotte


In response to “Lawsuit: Ban coyote hunting, save wolves” (Dec. 17) and related articles:

Red wolves balance ecosystem, N.C. must work to save them

The red wolf is dying out and it’s time we started doing something about it!

There are only about 250 left. They all live in North Carolina.

Today, red wolves flourish freely only in North Carolina. Wolves are not really the predators; they’re the balancers. So losing them would be messing up the whole ecosystem.

The big question we must ask ourselves is can the red wolf be saved, or is it already lost?

Faith Swartz

Charlotte

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The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

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