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Congregations turn to compost for lessons on life and death

By Adelle M. Banks
Religion News Service
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/01/16/14/41/qtY2A.Em.138.jpeg|237
    - ANDREW SATTER
    A wheelbarrow filled with vegetable scraps stands near a composter at Church of the Pilgrims in Washington, D.C.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/01/16/14/41/K7pwF.Em.138.jpeg|332
    - ADELLE M. BANKS
    Minister Ashley Goff advocates composting as a ‘holy process.’

WASHINGTON The wheelbarrow outside the sanctuary was overflowing with vegetable scraps; decomposing matter filled the baptismal font; and a pile of rich brown soil replaced the Communion table.

Ashley Goff, minister for spiritual formation at Church of the Pilgrims in Washington, wanted to convey a message about the cycle of nature this fall, and she could think of no better analogy than the congregation’s growing enchantment with compost.

“I wanted them to see the process of life and death and change,” she said of her Presbyterian Church (USA) congregation of 70. “It’s a dying and a rising, where new life begins.”

Across the country in the past decade, hundreds of houses of worship have started composting, relating it to theological concepts of resurrection and stewardship.

Stacey Kennealy, sustainability director of GreenFaith, said congregations used to be put off by the challenges of composting – such as odor and pests – but now urban, suburban and rural houses of worship are digging into the practice.

“Compost is good for gardens, and as more and more congregations ‘green’ their food operations, and focus on waste reduction, they view composting as part of that,” she said.

Some congregations create the compost on site and others work with a commercial composting company that makes weekly collections.

Goff has written an article for Union Theological Seminary’s Quarterly Review about how her congregation turned from ignoring its soil to preparing food for hungry neighbors with vegetables grown from composted soil.

“We have a way of discarding our scraps that is a holy process rather than just unconsciously throwing it into the trash can as if it doesn’t matter anymore,” said Goff, who oversaw the blessing of her church’s first compost bin in 2010.

Yaira Robinson, associate director of Texas Interfaith Power & Light, said a synagogue and a Methodist church in Austin have used new composting services available in that city.

“Most everything from the lunch is compostable because we switched to compostable plates,” she said of the weekly Saturday meal served by Congregation Agudas Achim, a Conservative synagogue she attends.

With reports that 40 percent of food goes to waste, Robinson said, houses of worship are starting to take action.

“That’s just outrageous, especially when congregations are many times on the front line of people who don’t have enough to eat,” she said.

Barbara Rossing, a New Testament professor at Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, said more than earthy-crunchy congregations have taken to composting.

“It’s not just a bunch of liberal, left-wing people,” she said. “It’s people who’ve grown up on going to camp, people who have grown up on farms, people who for some reason love the watershed, love saving. I think it taps into some of the spirit of conservation and conservative values, too.”

The theological school produces 400 cubic feet of compost each year for its vegetable and landscape gardens, diverting more than 800 cubic feet of waste from the landfill, said Jim Schaal, sustainability coordinator.

From Baptists in North Carolina to Sikhs in California, composting has been adopted as an environmental and humanitarian pursuit.

Rabbi Fred Scherlinder Dobb of Adat Shalom Reconstructionist Congregation in Bethesda, Md., congregation, said: “Genesis 2 tells us that the human (adam) comes from the earth (adamah), and that our mandate is ‘to serve and to guard’ the land. That starts, literally, with guarding and conserving the organic matter upon which our crops and our lives depend.”

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