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Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014

Religion news

If you have news about your faith community, please send announcements and photos to ebattenobserver@gmail.com.

Compiled by Erica Batten

Temple Beth El

Comparative religion series: “Evil … Human or Divine?” Speakers will promote understanding of major religions. All speakers will address evil and its roots in their faiths’ theology, freewill and how their religion guides believers to deal with evil. 7-9 p.m. Tuesdays. On Feb. 4, Tamar Myers, daughter of former African Mennonite missionaries, will present a Mennonite perspective.

Classes: Temple Beth El University presents “Superheroes and Judaism.” Rabbi Jonathan Freirich and Sara Bryan Markovits will lead a multimedia exploration of the Jewish imagination’s expression into the realm of superheroes, from demon-conquering rabbis in the Talmud to Superman and Batman. Members, $36; regular price, $52. Financial assistance available. 7-9 p.m. Feb. 5, 12 and 19. Register by Feb. 4. 5101 Providence Road. 704-366-1948; www.beth-el.com.

First Baptist, Indian Trail

Real Evangelism Conference: Guest preachers John Hagee, Phil Hoskins, Bob Pitman, Junior Hill, Rick Coram, many more. Musical guests the Mike Speck Trio, Greater Vision, and the Collingsworth Family. March 5-7. 732 Indian Trail-Fairview Road, Indian Trail. 704-882-1005; www.fbcit.org.

Congregation Ohr HaTorah

Class: Rabbis Yossi Groner and Shlomo Cohen will present a six-week course, “To Be a Jew in the Free World: Jewish Identity Through the Lens of Modern History.” $95 per person or $175 per couple. Materials included. 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays starting Feb. 4 or 11 a.m. Wednesdays starting Feb. 5. 6619 Sardis Road. 704-366-3984; www.chabadnc.org.

Calvary Church

English classes: Learn to speak English or improve skills. Five levels offered. $50 per semester. Child care available. 9-11 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Bible study electives: Topics include Effective Parenting, Discipleship Essentials, The Gospel of John, more. Join anytime. Children’s and teen programs available. 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesdays. Dinner served at 5 p.m. $15 family maximum. www.calvarychurch.com.

Exercise classes: Classes for men and women of all ages. $20 per month. Seated upper body strength training, 11:15 a.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Healthy Hearts cardio stretching and toning, 10:15 a.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Healthy Bodies, 11:15 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. Total Strength, 6 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. 1501 Pineville-Matthews Road. www.champsportsinfo.com.

Sharon United Methodist

Sermon series: “Real World: SouthPark” will explore “real” life. Join us for the discussion. The sermon for Feb. 2 is “Catfish.” 9 and 11:15 a.m. Sundays. 4411 Sharon Road. 704-366-9166; www.sharonumc.org.

St. Matthew Catholic

Information session: Learn about Special Religious Development Program (SPRED) for persons of all ages with developmental delays, mental challenges or autism. SPRED prepares participants to share in the liturgical and sacramental life of the church. 7 p.m. Feb. 5. 8015 Ballantyne Commons Parkway. www.stmatthewcatholic.org.

Shepherd’s Center SouthEast

Book club: Discussion of Erik Larson’s “Devil in the White City.” Please read selection prior to the meeting. Newcomers welcome. The club meets the second Tuesday of each month. 10-11:30 a.m. Feb. 12 at the Sardis House at Sardis Presbyterian, 6100 Sardis Road. 704-321-0325; pegndale@gmail.com.

The Shepherd’s Center of Charlotte

Free tax service: Trained volunteers will counsel seniors on state and federal income taxes. 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays at Providence Baptist, 4921 Randolph Road. Appointments: 704-365-1995.

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