Developer’s plan raises questions on density
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Friday, Mar. 07, 2014

Developer’s plan raises questions on density

  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/03/07/13/26/zVkwa.Em.138.jpeg|237
    - Elisabeth Arriero - earriero@charlotteobserver.com
    The single-family detached homes that Oakmont Home Builders is planning will range from 2,000 square feet of living space to upwards of 2,200 square feet.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/03/07/13/26/D2lNS.Em.138.jpeg|237
    - Elisabeth Arriero - earriero@charlotteobserver.com
    The single-family detached homes that Oakmont Home Builders is planning will range from 2,000 square feet of living space to upwards of 2,200 square feet.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/03/07/13/26/1137X4.Em.138.jpeg|270
    - COURTESY OF JUDSON STRINGFELLOW
    A rendering of a home that Oakmont Home Builders wants to build on Silver Stream Road in Charlotte.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/03/07/13/26/IzZu2.Em.138.jpeg|237
    ELISABETH ARRIERO - earriero@charlotteobserver.com
    Charlotte-based Oakmont Home Builders is building 10 single-family homes on three parcels that used to house two duplexes and a triplex.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/03/07/13/26/VqXGo.Em.138.jpeg|285
    - COURTESY OF JUDSON STRINGFELLOW
    A rendering of a home that Oakmont Home Builders wants to build on Silver Stream Road in Charlotte.

A developer planning 10 single-family homes where three multifamily homes formerly stood, on Silver Stream Road in south Charlotte, has attracted concern from some nearby residents who worry about the project’s density.

Charlotte-based Oakmont Home Builders purchased the three parcels off Swans Run Road in fall 2013. The land, zoned R-12 MF, had at one point held two duplexes and a triplex.

Oakmont Home Builders, which specializes in affordable new homes and townhomes in Charlotte, has operated in the region since 1994.

Oakmont Home Builders purchased 3307, 3319 and 3329 Silver Stream Road in 2013. The three parcels total 1.38 acres and were valued at $565,400 in the 2011 revaluation, according to property records.

After the company purchased the land, it decided to level the property. In its place, the company wants to build single-family homes, said Judson Stringfellow, owner of Oakmont Home Builders.

“We’re trying to upgrade the area and provide something far in excess of what’s there now,” Stringfellow said. “We’re taking a little bit of a risk by going in there and starting to redevelop stuff when there is still some older stuff around there.”

The single-family detached homes will range from 2,000 square feet to upwards of 2,200 square feet and will be marketed for the upper-$100,000s to the low $200,000s, he said.

Streets connected to the community also feature duplexes built several decades ago. But homeowners in the adjacent Arboretum Crossing neighborhood, at the back of the property, said they’re concerned about the number of trees cut down and the project’s density.

In late 2013, developers began cutting down some of the trees on the property on Silver Stream to make way for the new homes.

“I’m concerned about the clearing of all the trees and the grading,” said Chris Sodeberg, who lives on Bon Rea Drive. “When I looked outside, I used to see trees. Now I’m going to be looking at 10 homes, one after another. It’s disheartening.”

Sodeberg said he’s lived in his single-family, 1.5-story home since 2001. His property, zoned R-3, shares borders with the development’s property.

Chris Marsh, who lives a couple of doors down from Sodeberg, also said she was concerned about trees being cleared. Marsh said she also is concerned because the cleared woods mean more people cutting through the backyards of homes on Bon Rea to get to the nearby Arboretum Shopping Center.

“When the woods were denser, we didn’t have as much of that,” Marsh said.

Ultimately, the three parcels will be divided into 10 lots, Stringfellow said.

But he said the density is not as much as is legally allowed according to current zoning. The land could hold up to 16 or 17 units, said Stringfellow.

That’s true if Stringfellow were to build multifamily units, said Mark Fowler, a city code-enforcement supervisor. But because of buffer and lot-width requirements, the property is actually maxed out for single-family homes.

The city ordinance requires that properties within R-12 MF zoning have a minimum lot width of 40 feet. The required setback for structures in this zone is five feet from the side property line and 20 feet from the rear. The front must be 32 feet from the back of the curb, Fowler said.

Address points recorded for the new parcels show that the lot width is already about 40 feet, meaning the developer wouldn’t be able to add any more single-family units without going below that lot-width threshold, Fowler said.

Stringfellow said he’s confident residents will be pleased when the project is complete.

“We’re kind of pioneering the redevelopment of the area,” he said. “We’re building something far nicer than what was there before.”

Staff researcher Maria David contributed.

Arriero: 704-358-5945; Twitter: @earriero

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