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    Nancy Pierce -
    Hwy 21 through Fort Lawn, S.C.
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    Nancy Pierce -
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    Nancy Pierce -
    U.S. 21 and Landsford Canal Road, Chester County, S.C.: As the historic marker describes, Landsford was an early ford on the Catawba, probably named for Thomas Land, who received a nearby land grant from the Crown in 1755.
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    Nancy Pierce -
    In Chester County, Tommy Westbrook says his great-great-grandfather, Mexican and Confederate War veteran Capt. Alexander Thomas owned this land.
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    Nancy Pierce -
    U.S. 21 in Chester County: Tommy and Linda Westbrook recall how their children, in the 1970s, walked to the WD Fudge Store for nickel Coca-Colas and candy.
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    Nancy Pierce -
    Catawba River Road (U.S. 21) near Catawba, S.C.: Since 1972, families have gathered on Friday nights at Dixie Stockyard, Auction and Grill.
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    Nancy Pierce - Nancy Pierce
    Catawba River Road (U.S. 21) near Catawba, S.C.: The Dixie Grill at Dixie Stockyard serves a robust dinner, then children pick out their favorite small animals and beg their parents to bid.
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    Nancy Pierce -
    Nation Ford crossing, Catawba River, Norfolk Southern trestle: At the Nation Ford crossing, granite shoals provided firm footing for horses and wagons to cross the river.
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    Nancy Pierce -
    US 21 bridge over the Catawba River between Fort Mill and Rock Hill, first built in 1917 before it was US 21. Replaced in 2012.
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    Nancy Pierce -
    On the Catawba River, 100 yards downstream from the U.S. 21 bridge at Rock Hill: This water intake is all that remains of the former Celriver Celanese plant.
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    Nancy Pierce -
    South Boulevard (formerly U.S. 21), Charlotte: This is all that remains of the original South 21 Curb Service Restaurant, opened by Greek immigrants in 1954 in the countryside outside Charlotte. At its peak, it had 54 car stations. South 21 closed around 2007, but a second South 21 Curb Service Restaurant still operates on Independence Boulevard.
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    Nancy Pierce -
    East Independence Boulevard, Charlotte: South 21 on Independence Boulevard, named for its sibling restaurant on South Boulevard (then-U.S. 21) opened in 1959 and is still in business. A South 21 Jr. Ð without curb service Ð has been on North Tryon Street near UNC Charlotte since the early 1960s.
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    Nancy Pierce -
    3100 Statesville Road, Charlotte: Barber James Daughtry shows off his high school yearbook from Our Lady of Consolation Catholic School. He keeps it on hand to share with customers at Charles & Son Barber shop. His employer, Charles Alexander, has operated this barber shop on Statesville Road for 42 years.
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    Nancy Pierce -
    4227 Statesville Road, just past I-85 interchange: In the 1960s David WikeÕs father, Jerry, was hauling produce for a living when he decided to open a store on Statesville Road. He hired his entire family, and now David owns and manages JerryÕs Market. With its fiercely loyal customers, the store is one of the few independent neighborhood markets in CharlotteÕs predominantly low-income African-American neighborhoods.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/04/03/23/38/GS26F.St.138.jpeg|415
    Nancy Pierce -
    tatesville Road, Metrolina Expo: As Mecklenburg County urbanized in the 1950s, county agricultural fairs were no longer profitable. But in 1965 fair-lover Horace Wells and partners bought 145 acres along U.S. 21 north of Charlotte and established Metrolina Fairgrounds and Racetrack, determined to continue the tradition. The county agricultural fair survived until 1987. The grounds, still owned by Horace WellsÕ family, are now the Metrolina Expo, an exhibit and event facility.
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    Nancy Pierce -
    Former Metrolina Speedway: Built in the mid-1960s at Metrolina Fairgrounds, Metrolina Speedway was a half-mile banked clay track. The track foundered during the late 1980s and closed for good in the 1990s.
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    Nancy Pierce -
    Built in the mid-1960s, the old Metrolina Speedway closed for good in the 1990s.
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    Nancy Pierce -
    Barium Springs, U.S. 21 between Troutman and Statesville: Founded in 1891 as Presbyterian Orphans Home in Charlotte, the home moved to rural Iredell County. The Lottie Arey Walker building was a girlsÕ dormitory. From 1922 to 1950 Barium Springs thrived as a self-supporting farm, orchard, laundry, print shop, shoe repair shop and school connected with the Presbyterian Church. Today, Barium Springs is an independent, nonprofit child welfare agency.
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    Nancy Pierce -
    Davie Avenue. (U.S. 21), near downtown Statesville: Most of the 76 buildings in this Statesville historic district are homes. Like this late Victorian house built in 1918, a few are being converted to businesses and offices.
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    Nancy Pierce -
    Turnersburg Highway (U.S. 21) and Bethany Road north of Statesville: Ebenezer Academy, chartered in 1823 and used as a school until 1903. Built in the half dovetail log cabin style, this is the original building, heavily restored. Inside can be found mottos for good behavior carved into the original wood.
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    Nancy Pierce -
    U.S. 21 bridge over Rocky Creek, Turnersburg: Sometime before 1812, George Locke built a sawmill on these Rocky Creek Shoals and a stately house on the hill, along the Great Wagon Road. Later owners Wilfred Turner and partners added a textile mill, gin, general store, worker housing, a hydro generating facility and other enterprises, collectively known as Turnersburg. The 200-year-old house now functions as Ò1812 Hitching Post,Ó an event venue. This sawmill is still in service.
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    Nancy Pierce
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