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  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/04/07/15/35/jGKd5.St.138.jpeg|521
    Markus Schreiber - AP
    In this Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014 file photo the 'New Synagogue' at the Oranienburger Strasse in Berlin glimpse in the bright sun. The epicenter of the Holocaust, the city where Hitler signed the death warrants of 6 million Jews, seems an unlikely candidate for the worlds fastest growing Jewish community. But despite this stigma of Nazism, Berlins dynamic, prosperous present and its rich, pre-World War II Jewish past initially attracted an influx from the former Soviet Union and has continued with the arrival of thousands of Israelis and smaller numbers of often young immigrants from Australia, France, the United States and elsewhere.
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    Markus Schreiber - AP
    In this Aug. 31, 2007 file photo rabbis carry the Torah scrolls in a solemn procession during the reopening after renovation of Germany's biggest synagogue at the Rykestrasse in Berlin, Germany. The epicenter of the Holocaust, the city where Hitler signed the death warrants of 6 million Jews, seems an unlikely candidate for the worlds fastest growing Jewish community. But despite this stigma of Nazism, Berlins dynamic, prosperous present and its rich, pre-World War II Jewish past initially attracted an influx from the former Soviet Union and has continued with the arrival of thousands of Israelis and smaller numbers of often young immigrants from Australia, France, the United States and elsewhere.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/04/07/15/44/m9sBo.St.138.jpeg|377
    Markus Schreiber - AP
    In this file photo, rabbis carry the Torah scrolls in a solemn procession during the reopening after renovation of Germany's biggest synagogue at the Rykestrasse in Berlin's district Prenzlauer Berg. The epicenter of the Holocaust, the city where Hitler signed the death warrants of 6 million Jews, seems an unlikely candidate for the worlds fastest growing Jewish community. But despite this stigma of Nazism, Berlins dynamic, prosperous present and its rich, pre-World War II Jewish past initially attracted an influx from the former Soviet Union and has continued with the arrival of thousands of Israelis and smaller numbers of often young immigrants from Australia, France, the United States and elsewhere.
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    Markus Schreiber - AP
    This Thursday, March 6, 2014 file photo shows an areial view of the Liebeskind building with the Garden of Exile in front of the Jewish Museum in Berlin. The epicenter of the Holocaust, the city where Hitler signed the death warrants of 6 million Jews, seems an unlikely candidate for the worlds fastest growing Jewish community. But despite this stigma of Nazism, Berlins dynamic, prosperous present and its rich, pre-World War II Jewish past initially attracted an influx from the former Soviet Union and has continued with the arrival of thousands of Israelis and smaller numbers of often young immigrants from Australia, France, the United States and elsewhere.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/04/07/15/35/WOlwI.St.138.jpeg|416
    Markus Schreiber - AP
    In this , March 6, 2014 file photo people visit the a void called the Holocaust Tower inside the Liebeskind building of the Jewish Museum in Berlin. TThe epicenter of the Holocaust, the city where Hitler signed the death warrants of 6 million Jews, seems an unlikely candidate for the worlds fastest growing Jewish community. But despite this stigma of Nazism, Berlins dynamic, prosperous present and its rich, pre-World War II Jewish past initially attracted an influx from the former Soviet Union and has continued with the arrival of thousands of Israelis and smaller numbers of often young immigrants from Australia, France, the United States and elsewhere.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/04/07/15/35/5mFCC.St.138.jpeg|416
    Markus Schreiber - AP
    This Thursday, March 6, 2014 file photo shows the Garden of Exile in front of the Liebeskind building of the Jewish Museum in Berlin. The epicenter of the Holocaust, the city where Hitler signed the death warrants of 6 million Jews, seems an unlikely candidate for the worlds fastest growing Jewish community. But despite this stigma of Nazism, Berlins dynamic, prosperous present and its rich, pre-World War II Jewish past initially attracted an influx from the former Soviet Union and has continued with the arrival of thousands of Israelis and smaller numbers of often young immigrants from Australia, France, the United States and elsewhere.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/04/07/15/44/Gghnh.St.138.jpeg|416
    Markus Schreiber - AP
    This Friday, June 17, 2011 file photo shows a general view of the Memorial for the murdered Jews of Europe, the so called Holocaust Memorial in central Berlin. The epicenter of the Holocaust, the city where Hitler signed the death warrants of 6 million Jews, seems an unlikely candidate for the worlds fastest growing Jewish community. But despite this stigma of Nazism, Berlins dynamic, prosperous present and its rich, pre-World War II Jewish past initially attracted an influx from the former Soviet Union and has continued with the arrival of thousands of Israelis and smaller numbers of often young immigrants from Australia, France, the United States and elsewhere.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/04/07/15/44/1bqNlj.St.138.jpeg|416
    Markus Schreiber - AP
    In this picture taken Tuesday March 11, 2014 tourists visit the Memorial for the murdered Jews of Europe, the so called Holocaust Memorial in central Berlin, Germany. The epicenter of the Holocaust, the city where Hitler signed the death warrants of 6 million Jews, seems an unlikely candidate for the worlds fastest growing Jewish community. But despite this stigma of Nazism, Berlins dynamic, prosperous present and its rich, pre-World War II Jewish past initially attracted an influx from the former Soviet Union and has continued with the arrival of thousands of Israelis and smaller numbers of often young immigrants from Australia, France, the United States and elsewhere.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/04/07/15/44/Qagbd.St.138.jpeg|525
    Markus Schreiber - AP
    This Thursday, March 6, 2014 file photo shows a woman climbing the stairs inside the Liebeskind building of the Jewish Museum in Berlin. The epicenter of the Holocaust, the city where Hitler signed the death warrants of 6 million Jews, seems an unlikely candidate for the worlds fastest growing Jewish community. But despite this stigma of Nazism, Berlins dynamic, prosperous present and its rich, pre-World War II Jewish past initially attracted an influx from the former Soviet Union and has continued with the arrival of thousands of Israelis and smaller numbers of often young immigrants from Australia, France, the United States and elsewhere.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/04/07/15/44/1jEy4R.St.138.jpeg|416
    Markus Schreiber - AP
    This Tuesday, March 11, 2014 picture shows a general view of the Memorial for the murdered Jews of Europe, the so called Holocaust Memorial in central Berlin, Germany. The epicenter of the Holocaust, the city where Hitler signed the death warrants of 6 million Jews, seems an unlikely candidate for the worlds fastest growing Jewish community. But despite this stigma of Nazism, Berlins dynamic, prosperous present and its rich, pre-World War II Jewish past initially attracted an influx from the former Soviet Union and has continued with the arrival of thousands of Israelis and smaller numbers of often young immigrants from Australia, France, the United States and elsewhere.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/04/07/15/44/WOlBG.St.138.jpeg|285
    Markus Schreiber - AP
    This May 4, 2010 file photo shows a general view of the Memorial for the murdered Jews of Europe, the so called Holocaust Memorial in central Berlin, Germany. The epicenter of the Holocaust, the city where Hitler signed the death warrants of 6 million Jews, seems an unlikely candidate for the worlds fastest growing Jewish community. But despite this stigma of Nazism, Berlins dynamic, prosperous present and its rich, pre-World War II Jewish past initially attracted an influx from the former Soviet Union and has continued with the arrival of thousands of Israelis and smaller numbers of often young immigrants from Australia, France, the United States and elsewhere.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/04/07/15/44/jGKeh.St.138.jpeg|416
    Markus Schreiber - AP
    In this picture taken Monday, March 10, 2014 at the Rosa-Luxemburg-Street in the historic Berlin neighborhood 'Scheunenviertel', people pass so called 'Stolpersteine', or stumbling stones which remember to Jews killed by the Nazis. The epicenter of the Holocaust, the city where Hitler signed the death warrants of 6 million Jews, seems an unlikely candidate for the worlds fastest growing Jewish community. But despite this stigma of Nazism, Berlins dynamic, prosperous present and its rich, pre-World War II Jewish past initially attracted an influx from the former Soviet Union and has continued with the arrival of thousands of Israelis and smaller numbers of often young immigrants from Australia, France, the United States and elsewhere.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/04/07/15/44/XWmpl.St.138.jpeg|416
    Markus Schreiber - AP
    In this Nov. 9, 2013 file picture a woman cleans a so called 'Stolperstein', or stumbling stone, set by German artist Gunter Demnig, to remember Nazi victims in Berlin, Germany. The epicenter of the Holocaust, the city where Hitler signed the death warrants of 6 million Jews, seems an unlikely candidate for the worlds fastest growing Jewish community. But despite this stigma of Nazism, Berlins dynamic, prosperous present and its rich, pre-World War II Jewish past initially attracted an influx from the former Soviet Union and has continued with the arrival of thousands of Israelis and smaller numbers of often young immigrants from Australia, France, the United States and elsewhere.
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