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Observer Forum: Letters to the editor

Duke Energy has forgotten its community-minded roots

When my dad and William B. McGuire were backdoor neighbors, Dad’s purchases of Duke Power stock were an investment in a philanthropic and community-minded North Carolina company. Today Duke Energy is fighting net metering for those of us who have solar panels on our rooftops. We who have invested for the future, for our communities and for healthy and sustainable power generation, are being opposed by an unresponsive giant.

I have sold all the stock my dad once gave me. Instructed by the civic legacy of those two Charlotte neighbors, I’ve concluded that Duke Energy no longer remembers its origins.

Mary Miller Stair

Asheville

Customers, shareholders both should pay for Duke cleanup

To Duke customers: Since Duke initially chose a lower-cost option for coal ash storage, you have been paying lower electric rates for years. Therefore, a rate increase to pay for part of an improved solution is fair.

To Duke: Prior management made several mistakes by locating an ash storage pit next to a city water supply, not lining pits and building one over an active metal water pipe. Company owners pay for management’s mistakes. Therefore, Duke shareholders need to pay their share of the cost of correction.

Jeff Hunter

Charlotte


In response to “Georgia’s new gun law endangers the innocent” (April 27 Forum):

Another anti-gun alarmist chooses to ignore the facts

I would ask Forum writer W.L. Pettis to provide statistics on how many law-abiding, licensed gun owners who carry a concealed weapon have committed accidental shootings, collateral murders, hurt an innocent child, or “snuffed-out a co-worker” while legally carrying their concealed weapon. His rhetoric is just another example of the unfounded hysteria that anyone opposed to the right of self-protection, guaranteed by the Second Amendment, is taught to spew forth when needed.

Mike Vee

Concord


In response to “Creating a sense of place in an urban space” (April 27):

Crescent wants to rip out uptown’s aorta for its benefit?

Fred Kent, of New York’s Projects for Public Spaces, retained by Crescent Communities, thinks Crescent’s Tryon Place could be a “great start” for Charlotte’s uptown – if only Overstreet Mall is demolished, “the sooner the better.”

If I owned an uptown development site at a significant competitive disadvantage due to lack of access to Overstreet Mall, I might feel the same way.

Four years after Crescent Resources failed to manage its own affairs and imploded into bankruptcy, its successor evidently feels entitled to manage not only its own affairs, but those of others.

William E. Little Jr.

Weddington


End Common Core; maybe China provides a better model

Replace Common Core with common sense. America is over-regulated and under-parented.

While China limits population growth, the U.S. rewards the creation of generational cycles of parentless children who are not prepared for school or contributing productively to our society.

Raising teacher pay and setting minimal educational standards will never replace the positive influence of family. Our social engineering policies are a failure and the root cause of many of our country’s problems.

Phillip Greene

Charlotte

Before ending Common Core, think about who’d replace it

If the proposal to scrap the Common Core is adopted by our legislators, then “political appointees” will be among those who write new N.C. standards. The same politicians who utterly and completely threw N.C. teachers under the bus will now be given the authority to create curriculum standards for N.C. children! How can they be trusted to understand, much less articulate, the educational needs of N.C. children?

One strength of the Common Core lies in the rigor of its standards – rigor that is necessary to meet the challenges of college classes or the workplace, and which research shows was woefully lacking in most previous state standards.

Frances Fincher

Newton


In response to “Writer omitted the ‘morally straight’ part of Scout Oath” (April 25 Forum):

103 years after Scout oath, standards have changed

Morals change over time. The Boy Scout Oath was adopted in 1911. At that time, a woman would have been considered immoral for wearing shorts in public.

Dave Ballenger

Monroe

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