Save Money in this Sunday's paper

U.S. Opinions: Pittsburgh

comments

End doctor shortage

From an editorial in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette on Monday:

Two months ago, 412 medical school graduates learned they would not have a place in the residency programs that should have capped their studies and led to a license to practice. That was more than just a disappointment for them and their families; it was bad news for the nation.

Most of these students had done their part by working hard in college and during medical school, often accruing massive personal debt in the process. But a lack of adequate federal funding for the country’s residency programs shut them out, the second straight year that has happened.

It’s a problem that’s only going to get worse if nothing changes.

The need for new doctors is growing, driven by three forces: the population is aging and requires more care, one-third of the physicians practicing today plan to retire in the coming decade, and the Affordable Care Act means more people have health insurance and access to doctors.

The federal investment in the next generation of doctors is not keeping up. The government pays for most of the cost of residencies, but Congress has not budged from the cap of $1 billion that it set in 1997. That’s enough for about 115,000 doctors in training, far fewer than the country needs.

By next year, the U.S. will fall short by 63,000 doctors and that figure will leap to 130,000 by 2025, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges.

Although most of the problems challenging the nation’s medical system defy simple solutions, that’s not true of the residency shortage. There are measures pending in Congress right now that would raise the spending to allow for more doctors. Like an infection left untreated, America’s doctor shortage will only get worse until lawmakers act.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

  Read more



Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

The Charlotte Observer welcomes your comments on news of the day. The more voices engaged in conversation, the better for us all, but do keep it civil. Please refrain from profanity, obscenity, spam, name-calling or attacking others for their views.

Have a news tip? You can send it to a local news editor; email local@charlotteobserver.com to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Charlotte Observer.

  Read more


Quick Job Search
Salary Databases
Your 2 Cents
Share your opinion with our Partners
Learn More
CharlotteObserver.com