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People hiring photographers to shoot everyday life

By KRISTI EATON
Associated Press
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/06/20/15/25/BPJJj.Em.138.jpeg|210
    - AP
    This 2013 photo provided by I Heart New York shows Kristain and Anzalee Rhodes at Brooklyn Bridge Park, in New York. Anzalee was eight months pregnant in the picture. The couple are hiring photographers from I Heart New York to document their experiences as young parents. Hiring professional photographers to capture everyday life and not just important events like weddings has become a lifestyles trend. (AP Photo/I Heart New York)
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/06/20/15/25/1kN3T2.Em.138.jpeg|473
    - AP
    This 2013 photo provided by I Heart New York shows Anzalee Rhodes holding her 10-day-old daughter Arabelle in her Long Island home. Rhodes and her husband Kristain Rhodes are hiring photographers from I Heart New York to document their experiences watching their daughter grow. Hiring professional photographers to capture everyday life and not just important events like weddings has become a lifestyles trend. (AP Photo/I Heart New York)
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/06/20/15/25/jEQZ.Em.138.jpeg|210
    - AP
    This February 2014 photo provided by I Heart New York shows Kristain and Anzalee Rhodes with their daughter Arabelle, at 5 months old, on their first family trip to the Brooklyn Museum in New York City. The couple are hiring photographers from I Heart New York to document their experiences watching their daughter grow. Hiring professional photographers to capture everyday life and not just important events like weddings has become a lifestyles trend. (AP Photo/I Heart New York)

When Anzalee and Kristain Rhodes look back at their daughter’s first year of life, they won’t be examining blurry camera phone photos. They’ll have crisp, finely detailed professional shots of a baby growing up before their eyes.

Each month, a team of professional photographers shoots them as they go about their daily lives at home and around New York City.

“As a baby, she changes every month. There’s something new. Her hair changes, everything changes within a month, and we wanted to be able to capture all those things,” said Anzalee Rhodes, 35, a statistician who lives on Long Island, N.Y.

The Rhodes are part of a trend of people hiring professional photographers to document not just big events like weddings, but everyday activities. Sometimes they want a milestone recorded – a child’s birthday party or family get-together. But often they’re hiring pros to photograph things they might otherwise have shot with their own cellphones or point-and-shoot cameras: a weekend outing, a vacation or a portrait of a beloved pet.

Those photos are then shared, just like their own cell pictures would be, on social media sites.

“There’s a lot more sharing in general, so that is expanding the footprint of what people will consider to have professionally documented,” said Tim Beckford, a photographer known as Tim Co. with I Heart New York, the New York City-based company that shoots the Rhodes family each month.

“Why have blurry cell phone photos with just one of you actually in the photo?” reads I Heart New York’s website pitch. “Visiting (or living) in New York City is a big deal and we want your Facebook friends to be VERY jealous.” People from as far away as Australia have responded by hiring I Heart New York to document their trips to the Big Apple.

Just like with a selfie you post from your phone, the company’s work can be seen right away online. I Heart New York will photograph a proposal and provide a near-instantaneous shot so clients can post it to social media sites – and change their relationship status at the same time, Beckford said.

Is it possible to present a realistic view if a photographer is staging and enhancing each shot? Catalina Toma, a University of Wisconsin-Madison professor whose research includes examining emotional well-being and social media, says people tend to construct flattering images of themselves online.

“They don’t realize that everybody is doing the same thing, engaging in the same strategy as themselves, which is to sort of ignore the negative or the trivial or the banal, and posting only the best stuff, the exciting stuff.” And that’s true whether they are taking selfies or hiring someone.

Liz Bowling, 33, an account executive, first hired a professional photographer to shoot her wedding and then her newborn daughter, Ashlyn. Since then, she’s had the same photographer travel from Boulder, Colo., to her home in Lake Tahoe to capture her family a handful of times.

“It’s not just a staged photograph. She captures very authentic moments,” Bowling said. “I really want images that are going to show who I was when, and she does that.”

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