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Seattle city attorney's 1st-day pot buy broke rule

  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/07/08/19/27/466-116fvT.Em.55.jpeg|210
    Elaine Thompson - AP Photo
    Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes waves his bag of marijuana to waiting photographers after making a purchase inside at Cannabis City in Seattle, on Tuesday, July 8, 2014, the first day that sales of recreational pot became legal in the state. Washington on Tuesday became the second state to allow people to buy marijuana legally without a doctor's note as eager customers who lined up outside stores made their purchases and savored the moment.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/07/08/19/27/43-11eKx.Em.55.jpeg|189
    Elaine Thompson, Pool - AP Photo
    Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes, left, Jeremy Cooper and Deb Greene walk out after being among the very first customers to legally purchase recreational pot in Seattle at Cannabis City, Tuesday, July 8, 2014. Washington on Tuesday became the second state to allow people to buy marijuana legally in the U.S. without a doctor's note as eager customers who lined up outside stores made their purchases and savored the moment.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/07/08/19/27/699-Sw4js.Em.55.jpeg|200
    Elaine Thompson, Pool - AP Photo
    Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes, left, shakes hands with clerk Pam Fenstermacher after purchasing marijuana at Cannabis City, Tuesday, July 8, 2014, in Seattle, on the first day that sales of recreational pot became legal in the state. Washington on Tuesday became the second state to allow people to buy marijuana legally in the U.S. without a doctor's note as eager customers who lined up outside stores made their purchases and savored the moment.
  • http://media.charlotteobserver.com/smedia/2014/07/08/19/27/732-ijBCM.Em.55.jpeg|180
    Elaine Thompson, Pool - AP Photo
    Alison Holcomb, left, criminal justice director at the Washington state ACLU, holds her framed first-purchase of legal marijuana as she stands with Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes and state Sen. Jeanne Kohl- Welles at Cannabis City Tuesday, July 8, 2014, in Seattle, on the first day that sales of recreational pot became legal in the state. Washington on Tuesday became the second state to allow people to buy marijuana legally in the U.S. without a doctor's note as eager customers who lined up outside stores made their purchases and savored the moment.

SEATTLE Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes acknowledges he broke a drug-free workplace rule when he brought marijuana back to his office after buying on the first day of legal sales in Washington state.

Holmes has been a big supporter of the legal marijuana law, and he says he wanted to be one of the first customers at Seattle's Cannabis City on Tuesday to honor what he called a "tectonic shift" in policy. He says he brought the two unopened packages back to City Hall before taking them home.

The next day, the city's personnel department issued a memo reminding employees they can't have marijuana when they're on official business or at city offices.

Holmes issued an apology Friday and said he volunteered to donate $3,000 to the Downtown Emergency Service Center, an organization that provides housing for alcoholic, mentally ill or otherwise vulnerable people.

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